Commission on Colleges

                                        Southern Association of Colleges and Schools

 

     COMPLIANCE CERTIFICATION

 

Name of Institution         Spartanburg Community College

 

Date of Submission         March 15, 2005

 

In order to be accredited by the Commission on Colleges, an institution is required to conduct a compliance audit prior to the filing of the Compliance Certification.  The Compliance Certification, signed by the institution=s chief executive officer and accreditation liaison, attests to compliance with the accreditation requirements of the Commission on Colleges (Core Requirements and Comprehensive Standards). 

  

Signatures Attesting to Compliance

 

By signing below, we attest to the honest assessment of compliance and the complete and accurate disclosure of information regarding the compliance of Spartanburg Community College with the Core Requirements and Comprehensive Standards of the Commission on Colleges. 

   

Accreditation Liaison
 

    Name of Accreditation Liaison  Kemp I. Sigmon

    Signature   
   
Date  March 15, 2005

  

  

Chief Executive Officer
 

    Name of Chief Executive Officer  Dr. Dan L. Terhune

    Signature   
   
Date  March 15, 2005

 

Section 2 CORE REQUIREMENTS

2.1       The institution has degree-granting authority from the appropriate government agency or agencies.

            (Degree-granting Authority)

 

  Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Section 59-53-52, item 17 of the South Carolina Code of Laws states that the area commissions shall “award certificates, diplomas and associate…degrees to students who successfully complete authorized and prescribed courses and programs of study and training.”

 

An Act of the South Carolina Legislature in May 1961 initiated an extensive statewide program of technical training that established regional Technical Education Centers to aid the state’s economic development:

 

In November 1961, Spartanburg County received approval to provide a technical education center for the citizens in its region. The Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Training was formed to guide the development of the new center.  By May 1963, the center occupied the first building at its present site of Spartanburg Community College…In the fall of 1990, the College launched a new University Transfer Program through the establishment of associate degree programs in arts and sciences.

  

CORE REQUIREMENT 2.1

Documentation

On-Campus Location

POL I-30

 

 

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog, pages 8 and 9

 

 

South Carolina State Law section 59-53-52, item 17

 

 

Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education Bylaws and Special Rules of Order Article III and Article IV

 

 

2.2       The institution has a governing board of at least five members that is the legal body with specific authority over the institution.  The board is an active policy-making body for the institution and is ultimately responsible for ensuring that the financial resources of the institution are adequate to provide a sound educational program.  The board is not controlled by a minority of board members or by organizations or interests separate from it.  Neither the presiding officer of the board nor the majority of other voting members of the board have contractual, employment, or personal or familial financial interest in the institution.

 

A military institution authorized and operated by the federal government to award degrees has a public board in which neither the presiding officer nor a majority of the other members are civilian employees of the military or active/retired military.  The board has broad and significant influence upon the institution=s programs and operations, plays an active role in policy-making, and ensures that the financial resources of the institution are used to provide a sound educational program.  The board is not controlled by a minority of board members or by organizations or interests separate from the board except as specified by the authorizing legislation.  Neither the presiding officer of the board nor the majority of other voting board members have contractual, employment, or personal or familial financial interest in the institution.  (Governing Board)

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  The Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education, the governing board for Spartanburg Community College, consists of thirteen members.  South Carolina state law sets membership as stated in the Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education Bylaws and Special Rules of Order dated January 13, 2003, “Section 1 of Act 906 of 1962, as last amended by Act 197 of 1973, is further amended to read:

 

There is created the Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education which is a body politic and corporate and consists of thirteen members.”

 

The bylaws of the commission define the number of members and further detail the makeup of membership.  A list of current membership is on file in the President’s Office.  The secretary records membership attendance in the minutes of each commission meeting.

 

The commission bylaws state, “the Area Commission is a legislative body whose primary function is the determination of local policies, reserving to the administration and faculty the responsibilities for implementing policy through appropriate procedures and controls.” 

 

As an example of the commission’s policy-making authority, the minutes show approval of a policy on insurance continuation at the June 16, 2003, commission meeting.

 

The commission regularly receives a budget report showing projected and actual College revenue and expenses.  Commission minutes of November 17, 2003, state that College expenditures were under budget and forecast a surplus of revenue for the fiscal year.  Additionally, the College submits an annual proposed budget to the commission for approval.  August 18, 2003, minutes describe a proposed College budget with details of revenue sources and projected expenses for fiscal year 2003 with subsequent approval by the commission.  In the previous year, the College submitted a proposed budget and the commission approved it at the August 19, 2002, meeting.

 

Also, an external audit firm annually presents financial audit results to the commission.  The audit report of 2003/2004 showed no material findings.  

 

The commission bylaws state, “The Authority of the Area Commission rests in the Commission as a whole, not in individual commissioners.”  All commission meetings require a quorum of membership to conduct official business.  If a quorum of members is not present or is lost during a meeting, all official business ceases and must be postponed.  The Chair may cancel a meeting if a quorum is not present when he or she calls a meeting to order.  Commission minutes from October 21, 2002, offer cancellation of a commission meeting because a quorum of members was not present.

 

Neither the presiding officer of the board nor the majority of other voting members of the board have contractual, employment, or personal or familial financial interest in the institution.  The commission bylaws state, “A Commission member shall abstain from voting on any question or taking any official action on an issue that involves a possible conflict of interest.”

 

At the January 12, 2004, commission meeting, each member signed a Conflict of Interest, Compliance Certification certifying that he(she) is (1) familiar with Article VI, Section 2 Conflict of Interest in the commission’s bylaws, (2) will disclose to the commission chairperson any contractual, employment, or personal or familial financial interest in the College and (3) acknowledges by his or her signature that he or she is in accordance with the letter and spirit of this certification.

 

Spartanburg Community College is not a military college and therefore is not required to comply with the last section of this Core Requirement.

 

CORE REQUIREMENT 2.2

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education Bylaws and Special Rules of Order

page 4

page 7

page 8

page 14

page 18

 

 

Commission Meeting Minutes

August 19, 2002

October 21, 2002

June 16, 2003

August 18, 2003

September 13, 2004

November 17, 2003

January 12, 2004

 

 

Independent Auditors’ Report Financial Statements for the Year Ended June 30, 2004

 

 

Conflict of Interest, Compliance Certification forms

 

 

List of Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education Current Members

 

 

2.3       The institution has a chief executive officer whose primary responsibility is to the institution and who is not the presiding officer of the board. (Chief Executive Officer)

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  The bylaws of the Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education, which were revised and adopted January 13, 2003, address the duties of the President of the College in Article VII:

 

The President shall attend and participate, without vote, in all meetings of the Commission, except where the President’s performance is being discussed by the Commission or because of illness or necessary business, in which case, the President may appoint another person from the College as the President’s representative.

 

The President shall have the authority over and be responsible for all administration and managerial aspects of the development and operation of the College.

 

Article V of the bylaws states that the Chair of the Commission presides at all meetings of the commission, and the minutes of the commission meetings identify the Chair as the individual who calls the meetings to order and presides over the events.  Evidence of this appears in the minutes of the September 13, 2004, meeting of the commission that indicate the Chair called the meeting to order and presided over the events.

 

CORE REQUIREMENT 2.3

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education Bylaws and Special Rules of Order

Article V

Article VII

 

 

President’s Position Description Form

 

Human Resources Office

Commission Meeting Minutes, September 13, 2004

 

 

2.4       The institution has a clearly defined and published mission statement specific to the institution and appropriate to an institution of higher education, addressing teaching and learning and, where applicable, research and public service.  (Institutional Mission)

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Technical Education publishes its Mission Statement on page 5 of the Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog and on the College’s website.  The College Mission Statement reads as follows:

 

Spartanburg Community College is a comprehensive, public, suburban, two-year technical college serving the citizens of the upstate counties of Spartanburg, Union, and Cherokee in South Carolina. The College advances economic development of the region through programs that address emerging and continuing employment needs in a rapidly changing global environment. Programs and services provide accessible, affordable, equitable, state-of-the-art, postsecondary education that effectively (1) prepares students to enter, adapt to, or advance in technical or service career fields; (2) provides students with pre-baccalaureate programs and courses which transfer to senior colleges and universities; and (3) assists students in achieving their professional and personal goals. Annually, the College serves 4,000 to 6,000 credit-seeking students and 12,000 to 18,000 continuing education students.

In addition, Spartanburg Community College believes in the worth of individuals and their potential for growth and development and has thus listed, in the College catalog, values pertaining to students, faculty and staff, and the community.  The catalog also lists expected outcomes at a level appropriate to the students’ areas of study.  Annually the President’s Council and the Spartanburg Community College area commission review the mission statement to assure that the College’s mission and vision are appropriate and send mission statement revisions to the Commission on Higher Education for subsequent review and approval.

Most recently, the Spartanburg Community College area commission modified and approved the College’s mission statement January 13, 2003, and submitted the modification for approval to the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education, which they approved on June 5, 2003.

Since Spartanburg Community College is not a research/public service institution, outcomes are not addressed for that portion of the statement.

 

CORE REQUIREMENT 2.4

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog,

page 5

page 6

 

 

Area Commission Minutes, January 13, 2003

 

 

2.5       The institution engages in ongoing, integrated, and institution-wide research-based planning and evaluation processes that incorporate a systematic review of programs and services that (a) results in continuing improvement and (b) demonstrates that the institution is effectively accomplishing its mission. (Institutional Effectiveness)

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Institutional Planning

Spartanburg Community College planning processes incorporate a systematic review of programs and services that foster continuing improvement.  The results demonstrate that the institution is accomplishing its mission.

 

Description of the Process

Every five years the College completes an extensive study of its mission, vision and goals, as well as develops strategies to achieve the goals.  The resulting strategic plan describes effectiveness measures and expected outcomes for the next five-year period.  The College annually reviews the strategic plan to assure that the mission and future direction are appropriate.  The annual review of the mission requires area commission approval.  Each vice president reports his or her area’s relevant accomplishments toward achieving the goals described.  The College’s Planning and Development Office collects the lists of accomplishments and summarizes them in an Annual Improvement Plan (AIP) update.

 

The most recent strategic plan, developed in 1998-99 (with a 2005 target date), lists the College’s goals with strategies for accomplishing them.  In 1998, the College conducted an environmental scan of key constituencies.  The results of the scan were published in four booklets entitled Preparing the Work Force for the 21st Century: 1998 Community Based Research, 1998 Work Force Development Study, 1998 High School Survey, and 1998 Citizen Survey.  The scan was quite extensive and included a survey of 1,501 high school juniors; 293 businesses and industries; focus groups representing 63 companies, elected officials, human service employers, educators and health care providers; and 396 community citizens.  Then focus groups representing area commissioners, administrators, faculty, staff, and students used the scan results to develop College goals.  The ideas for the goal statements grew out of multiple SWOT (Strengths-Weaknesses-Opportunities-Threats) analyses groups, but specific statements were formulated by College administrators and small working committees representing faculty, staff, students, area commissioners, advisory committees, and local business and industry.   Finally, the committees and College administration suggested strategies to accomplish each goal.  The President’s Council gave final approval of the goal and strategy statements.  Examples of how the strategic plan helped the College achieve its mission include expansion of the College’s leadership committee to help the College develop current employees into tomorrow’s leaders (Goal 4, Strategy 3), development and expansion of online delivery systems in both credit and non-credit programs (Goal 1, Strategies 4 and 5), annual upgrades to Assistive Technology systems to support visually-impaired and hearing-impaired students (Goal 2, Strategy 2), and a new College telephone system and imaging system to improve external and internal communication.

 

The President’s Council approved effectiveness measures for the goals and strategies.  Most of the measures are derived from annual reports of the College’s experience; however, a few of the measures are based on biannual surveys, related to student satisfaction and employee satisfaction.  The surveys (ACT Student Survey, NILIE-PACE Survey, and CESTA Survey) stay relatively static over the two-year period, so annual measurements are not necessary.  Several of the measures were not developed locally but were adopted from the South Carolina CHE Performance Funding initiatives (denoted as pf below):

 

            Student Enrollment and Success (10 measures)

                        Curriculum Enrollment – headcount

                        Curriculum Enrollment – FTE

                        Continuing Education Revenue (replaced CE headcount)

                        Continuing Education Contact Hours

                        Minority Headcount (pf)

                        Minority Retention

                        Retention of Curriculum Students (overall)

                        Retention of Curriculum Students by Division

                        Student Satisfaction with Quality of Education

                        Student Satisfaction (overall)

 

            Graduate Success (6 measures)

                        Number of Graduates

                        Percent of Graduates Positively Placed

                        Graduate Satisfaction with Academic Preparation

                        Certification Exam Pass Rates (pf)
                        Employer Satisfaction with Graduates Hired

                        Employer Satisfaction with Technical and Personal Skills of Graduates

 

            Institutional Quality and Efficiency (10 measures)

                        Employee Satisfaction (overall)

                        Employee Satisfaction by Functional Area

                        Employee Satisfaction Survey Participation Rate by Functional Area

                        Employee Satisfaction vs. National Norms

                        Faculty/Staff Retention

                        Minority Employment (pf)

                        Foundation Funds for Scholarships and College Initiatives

                        Grant Funds Received

                        Administrative Costs vs. Academic Costs (pf)

                        General Overhead Cost per FTE (pf)

 

In June-July, the Office of Planning and Development collects information about the past year’s accomplishments and reports action plans for the following year from each of the major areas of the College (Academic Affairs, Business Affairs, Continuing Education, Planning and Development, Student Affairs, and the STC Foundation).  The Institutional Research department prepares charts with three to five years’ data on the College’s effectiveness measures.  A College Annual Improvement Plan Report, which is published in August, displays the collected reports of accomplishments, action plans, and charts.   The College AIP Report is distributed to the area commission, the President’s Council, and the library.  In addition, an electronic version of the document is posted on the College’s internal communication system (Public Folders), which is available to any employee.

 

Members of the President’s Council review the effectiveness measures, observing trends and responding to marked negative changes that point to problems or concerns. 

 

The following examples from the College’s Annual Improvement Plan illustrate institutional improvements resulting from the planning process.  The numbers in parentheses relate an accomplishment to a specific goal and strategy (1.1 = Goal 1, strategy 1).

 

Expansions

  • Participated as the educational component of the Hope VI community-based initiative (1.2)
  • Expanded Pharmacy Technology to daytime program (added to evening program) as certification regulations change (1.3)
  • Received approval to offer the Associate Degree Nursing curriculum (1.3)
  • Expanded advising services with the addition of the Advising Center to serve incoming students (2.2)
  • Established the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning for faculty support (4.1)
  • Assigned a full-time program director for the BMW Center (6.6)

           

Facility Improvements

  • Developed a “model office suite” of Office Systems Technology simulations (2.1)
  • Completed construction of two major building projects: the Dan Lee Terhune Student Services Building (3.1) and the Health and Human Services Building (3.3)
  • Completed a 10,000-square foot addition to the East Building, housing the Advising Center, Tutorial Learning Center, Testing Lab, and Open Computer Lab (3.2)
  • Completed major renovation projects in the East Building, West Building, and Ledbetter Building; improvements to the Ledbetter Building are in progress (3.3)
  • Completed construction of the horticulture garden pavilion (3.2)
  • Completed construction of a central energy plant (3.2)

 

New or Enhanced Technology

  • Fully-funded the Annual Technology Plan each year for the past five years, purchasing over $225,000 in replacement computer equipment (2.1)
  • Incorporated technology into academic programs (2.1) through the Title III grant
  • Replaced approximately one-third of campus computers each year for the previous three years (2.1)
  • Provided new and replacement assistive technology to support students with disabilities (2.2)
  • Implemented a new bookstore point-of-sale system (2.3)
  • Implemented web-based registration for curriculum students (2.3)
  • Purchased an imaging system to improve access to College records (2.3)
  • Updated library administrative database (4.5)

 

Distance Learning

  • Provided distance learning instruction to 533 students in 32 online classes and 1,200 students in 70 Web CT (course management software system) supplemented classes during Spring 2004 (1.5)
  • Provided ten video classes and 67 online courses to STC students and 25 online

courses to non-STC students through TechOnline (1.5)

  • Developed nine general education courses for 2003-04: ENG 101, ENG 102, ENG 165, ENG 228, MAT 101, MAT 102, MAT 110, MAT 160, and SOC 101 (1.4)

 

New Positions

  • Hired six new nursing faculty to staff Associate Degree Nursing program (1.3)
  • Hired new faculty member for Pharmacy Technology as program expands to meet area needs (1.3)
  • Hired new faculty position in computer area to meet area demands (1.3)
  • Employed two new advisors for the expanding role of the Advising Center (2.2)
  • Hired library technician as new position (2.2)

 

Services

  • Developed web pages for most areas of the College as a result of a five-year Title III grant (1.1)
  • Added collection of ebooks to library for Engineering Technology, Health and Human Services, and Business Technology (2.2)
  • Expanded role of Advisement Center to include advisement for all new Arts and

Sciences and Transitional Studies students (2.2)

  • Purchased assistive technology for main campus and BMW Center (2.2)
  • Purchased and implemented Budgetext to improve bookstore services (2.3)
  • Implemented the campus-wide electronic bulletin board system to improve

communication to students and staff (2.5)

 

New Curricula or Courses

  • Added Associate Degree Nursing program (1.3)
  • Added certificate programs in Special Needs certificate (Early Childhood Development),Receptionist, Administrative Accounting Specialist and Legal Administrative Specialist to meet the needs of the service area (1.3)
  • Expanded Pharmacy Technology program to daytime offering (1.3)

           

Curricula or Course Improvements

  • Associate degree program in Computer Technology with Web Page Design became Computer Technology with Web Page Development; certificate program in Web Page
  • Design became Web Page Development (1.3)
  • Certificate program in Pharmacy Technology added in daytime in Fall 2004 (1.3)
  • As a result of a five-year Title III grant, nearly all faculty have been trained in the use of classroom-related technology; most have modified courses as a result (1.4)

 

Planning and Mission

The College’s planning process is the primary instrument by which the College demonstrates its commitment to the mission to “provide accessible, affordable, equitable, state-of-the-art, postsecondary education that effectively prepares students to enter, adapt to, or advance in technical or service career fields; provides students with pre-baccalaureate programs and courses that transfer to senior colleges and universities; and assist students in achieving their professional and personal goals.”  Through the planning process, STC gathers information about the needs of the service area, provides programs and services to address these needs, and demonstrates its accountability.  Based on the College’s mission and institutional goals, each planning unit of the College develops its own mission and result-oriented goals and objectives.  The results of each unit's effectiveness process demonstrates the College’s commitment to providing excellent programs and services that meet the needs of Spartanburg, Cherokee and Union counties.

Planning and Budget

The link between the planning and budgeting process is the Annual Improvement Plan (AIP).  In the AIP, each unit of the College states its mission, measures its progress toward accomplishing its mission, and states its funding needs in order to achieve its goals.  Upon completion of the AIP, each vice president collects and summarizes the critical funding needs for his or her division.  At a series of planning and budgeting meetings each year, the President’s Council considers these critical funding needs.  The results of these meetings determine the College’s funding priorities for programs, staffing, equipment, and new initiatives.  Minutes of the budgeting meetings are recorded.

 

Departmental/Program Planning

Within the College, each department/program has a mission statement, goals, and effectiveness measures.  The departmental AIP describes the annual activities and expected outcomes to reach the department's goals.  The AIP is the reporting mechanism by which results of effectiveness measures are compared to expected outcomes and linked to budget planning.  Actions for improvement are determined, resources to achieve improvement activities are identified, and the expected outcomes for the next planning year are noted.  The departmental plans are developed during the spring of each year and given to the vice president for funding consideration at the April-June budgeting meetings.

 

The College has in place a system of assessment that assures that every department measures how effectively it achieves its goals.  Each department has an assessment plan that includes mission, goals, measures, expected outcomes, and an annual improvement plan.  Each spring, in time for the April-June budget meetings, College departments complete an assessment of results compared to expected outcomes.

 

Each department collects assessment data during the spring for inclusion into the AIP.  Once the department analyzes the data, it determines activities for improvement and describes these plans in the AIP.  When the AIP has been reviewed and budgets assigned, the department implements the activities (to the level of available funding).  Implementation for administrative departments is generally July-May; for academic departments, August – May (the College academic year).  At the end of the planning year, the evaluations occur within departments, and the planning, evaluation, and improvement cycle continues.

 

Timeline

The timelines for the College’s two planning cycles are shown below:

 

Timeline for AIP Process

5-Year Cycle

1-Year Cycle

 

Environmental Scan

Review Mission, Role and Scope, Values

Review Vision and Goals

Develop Strategies and Effectiveness Measures

 

Assess Effectiveness

            Review Mission (January)

            AIP review (February)

            Customer Input (March-April)

Develop Annual Improvement Plans (February – April)

Set Priorities, Allocate Resources, and Develop Budgets (April – July)

Publish College’s Annual Improvement Plan Report (August)

Implement Plan, Monitor Progress (August-May)

 

CORE REQUIREMENT 2.5

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Area Commission Minutes – Strategic Plan

September 13, 2004

September 15, 2003

September 16, 2002

 

 

Area Commission Minutes – Mission Statement

November 17, 2003

January 13, 2003

January 14, 2002

 

 

2005 Strategic Plan

 

 

 Strategic Plan AIP

2000-2001 (undated)

2001-2002 (August 30, 2002)

2002-2003 (August 29, 2003)

2003-2004 (August 31, 2004)

 

 

Booklets:

Preparing the Work Force for the 21st Century

1998 Citizen Survey

1998 Work Force Development Survey

1998 High School Survey

 

SACS Liaison Office

Budget Session Minutes

 

 

PRO I-60.1

 

 

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog, page 5

 

 

2.6       The institution is in operation and has students enrolled in degree programs.  (Continuous Operation)

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College was founded in 1961, when Spartanburg County received approval to provide a technical education training center to the residents of the designated service counties.  The Spartanburg County Technical Education Center occupied its first building in 1963 and enrolled 150 students in 9 industrial and engineering technology programs.  In 1974, recognizing the institution’s broadening scope and depth of academic program offerings, the Center officially became Spartanburg Community College.

 

Today, Spartanburg Community College offers a wide range of instructional programs which include associate degrees, diplomas, certificates, opportunities for occupational development, and community interest courses.  Annually, the College serves 4,000-6,000 credit-seeking students and 12,000 – 18,000 continuing education students.

 

The College is a member of the South Carolina Technical College System.  The Office of Institutional Research maintains and compiles current enrollment reports. The College distributes these enrollment reports to the State Technical College System, the SC Commission on Higher Education, and the Federal Department of Education (IPEDS). 

 

The College hosts a graduation ceremony every May to award earned degrees, diplomas, and certificates.  The College also publishes documents and a website that is accessible to the public.

 

CORE REQUIREMENT 2.6

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog, pages 8-9

 

 

Fall 2004 Course Schedule

 

 

Spartanburg Community College Student Planner & Handbook 2004-2005

 

 

Enrollment Reports

 

 

STC Home Page

 

 

South Carolina Technical College System Home Page

 

 

2.7       The institution  

 

            2.7.1    offers one or more degree programs based on at least 60 semester credit hours or the equivalent at the associate level; at least 120 semester credit hours or the equivalent at the baccalaureate level; or at least 30 semester credit hours or the equivalent at the post-baccalaureate, graduate, or professional level. The institution provides a written justification and rationale for program equivalency. (Program Length)

 

2.7.2        offers degree programs that embody a coherent course of study that is compatible with its stated purpose and is based upon fields of study appropriate to higher education.  (Program Content)

 

2.7.3        requires in each undergraduate degree program the successful completion of a general education component at the collegiate level that is (1) a substantial component of each undergraduate degree, (2) ensures breadth of knowledge,  and (3) is based on a coherent rationale.  For degree completion in associate programs, the component constitutes a minimum of 15 semester hours or the equivalent; for baccalaureate programs, a minimum of 30 semester hours or the equivalent. These credit hours are to be drawn from and include at least one course from each of the following areas: humanities/fine arts; social/behavioral sciences; and natural science/mathematics.  The courses do not narrowly focus on those skills, techniques, and procedures specific to a particular occupation or profession. The institution provides a written justification and rationale for course equivalency. (General Education)

 

2.7.4        provides instruction for all course work required for at least one degree program at each level at which if awards degrees.  If the institution makes arrangements for some instruction to be provided by other accredited institutions or entities through contracts or consortia, or uses some other alternative approach to meeting this requirement, the alternative approach must be approved by the Commission on Colleges.  In all cases, the institution demonstrates that it controls all aspects of its educational program. (Contractual Agreements for Instruction)

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Program Length

 

Spartanburg Community College offers 36 associate degree programs, varying in length from a minimum of 60 credit hours to a maximum of 91 credit hours.  All associate degree programs meet the criteria of the State Models as specified by the South Carolina Technical College System.  Also, the State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education and the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education have approved all associate degree programs.

 

Cluster

Program Name

CIP Code

Allowable Range: Semester Credit Hours (SCH)

Actual SCH

AAAS

Associate in Arts

Associate in Science

240101

60-66

60-66

62

62

AGR

Horticulture Technology

010601

60-70

70

AOT

General Technology

    - Basic Electronics*

    - Commercial Graphics*

    Early Childhood Development

       -Advanced Childcare Management*

       -Special Needs*

       -Infant Toddler*

    - Heating, Ventilation and AC*

    - Industrial Electronics Tech (IET)*

    - IET-Automated Mfg. Technology*

    - Industrial Mechanics Technology*

    - Interpreter Training

    - Machine Tool Technology*

    - Medical Assisting

    - Surgical Technology*

    - Welding*

309999

60-84

 

70

70

 

66

71

66

70

70

70

70

61

70

72

60

70

BUS

Management

    - Management (general)

    - w/ Culinary Arts Electives

    - w/ Fire Service Electives

    - w/ Hotel, Restaurant & Travel Elect.

    - w/ Information Technology Elect.

    - w/ Marketing Electives

520201

60-70

 

69

70

69

69

69

69

BUS

Accounting

520301

60-70

69

BUS

Office Systems Technology

- Office Systems Technology (general)

- Medical Option

520401

60-70

 

69

69

COM

Computer Technology

- Computer Technology (general)

- w/ Networking Electives

- w/ Web Page Development Elect.

110301

60-77

 

72

72

72

ENGR

General Engineering Technology

150000

60-77

62

ENGR

Engineering Graphics Technology

- w/ Architectural CAD

- w/ Mechanical CAD

151306

60-84

 

75

72

ENGR

Civil Engineering Technology

150201

60-77

77

ENGR

Electronics Engineering Technology

- w/ Computer Applications

- w/ Industrial Applications

150303

60-84

 

79

79

ENGR

Mechanical Engineering Technology

150805

60-84

78

HEA

Medical Laboratory Technology

511004

60-84

77

HEA

Radiologic Technology (Radiography)

510907

60-95

91

HEA

Nursing (ADN)*

511601

60-68

67

HEA

Respiratory Care

510908

60-84

84

IND

Automotive Technology

- Automotive Tech- Ford Asset

- Automotive Services Technology

470604

60-84

 

80

80

IND

Industrial Electronics Technology (IET)

470105

60-84

71

IND

IET-Automated Manufacturing Technology

470105

60-84

72

IND

Machine Tool Technology

480501

60-84

70

PSER

Interpreting (Interpreter Training)

161603

60-84

60

*Program hours as listed in the 2004-2005 Catalog addendum.

 

CORE REQUIREMENT 2.7.1

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog, pages 61-164

 

 

 

Program Content

 

Spartanburg Community College offers degree programs compatible with the College’s purpose. As stated in the College mission,

 

The College advances economic development of the region through programs that address emerging and continuing employment needs in a rapidly changing global environment.  Programs and services provide accessible, affordable, equitable, state-of-the-art, postsecondary education that effectively (1)  prepares students to enter, adapt to, or advance in technical or service career fields; (2)  provides students with pre-baccalaureate programs and courses which transfer to senior colleges and universities; and (3)  assists students in achieving their professional and personal goals.

 

The programs offered at Spartanburg Community College are appropriate to higher education and are in accordance with the State Models outlined by the South Carolina Technical College System.  The national accreditation of numerous programs at Spartanburg Community College is further evidence of their appropriateness.   

 

CORE REQUIREMENT 2.7.2

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog, page 5

 

 

State Program Models

 

 

 

General Education

 

The general education program at Spartanburg Community College is a substantial component of each associate degree offered at the College, with each of these degrees containing at least 15 semester credit hours of general education.  The general education requirements, based on a coherent rationale, ensure a breadth of knowledge.  The credit hours include at least one course from each of the following areas:  humanities/fine arts, social/behavior sciences, and natural science/mathematics.  Upon review, the compliance certification team discovered that the Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) program did not contain a humanities/fine arts requirement.  Subsequently, the Department of Nursing changed the program model to include a humanities/fine arts component and has submitted the new model to the State Board of Nursing for approval. 

 

The general education courses are not specific to a particular program or profession.  Instead, a variety of programs across the campus share general education courses.  For example, Public Speaking (SPC 205) is part of many associate degree programs at the College including, but not limited to, the Horticulture Technology degree, the Associate in Arts and the Associate in Science degrees, the associate degree in Management, the associate degree in Radiography, and the associate degree in Computer Technology.  The other general education course requirements also lend themselves to more than one program of study.

 

The College maintains certain expectations of students graduating with an associate degree.  Many of these expectations are directly related to student outcomes for successful completion of general education courses.

 

CORE REQUIREMENT 2.7.3

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog, pages 61-164

 

 

 

Contractual Agreements for Instruction         

 

Spartanburg Community College provides instruction for all course work required for thirty-six associate degree programs, five diploma programs, and twenty-six certificate programs. 

 

The Management with Fire Services Electives Associate Degree is the only program which requires arrangements for some instruction by another accredited institution.  This particular management program requires 15 semester credit hours of fire service electives.  Students may take these electives from an accredited institution or earn through experiential learning by the completion of local, state and National Fire Academy training courses.

 

CORE REQUIREMENT 2.7.4

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog Addendum, page 5

 

 

South Carolina Technical College System Guidelines for Awarding Exemption Credit for Certification Training Offered by the National Fire Academy or the South Carolina Fire Academy

 

 

Course Articulation List South Carolina Technical Colleges and South Carolina Fire Academy

 

 

2.8       The number of full-time faculty members is adequate to support the mission of the institution. The institution has adequate faculty resources to ensure the quality and integrity of its academic programs. In addition, upon application for candidacy, an applicant institution demonstrates that it meets the comprehensive standard for faculty qualifications.  (Faculty)

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College has adequate faculty resources to ensure the quality and integrity of its academic programs.  During Fall Semester 2003, Spartanburg Community College employed 104 full-time faculty members and 107 adjunct faculty members. During Spring Semester 2004, the College employed 106 full-time faculty members and 106 adjunct faculty members.  During Fall Semester 2003, for the full-time faculty, the academic preparations were as follows:

 

            Type of Degree                                                      

 

            Doctoral Degree                   11%

            Master’s Degree                   55%

            Bachelor’s Degree               19%

            Associate Degree                11%

            Certificate                                3%

            High School Degree               1%

 

Faculty members have appropriate experience, hold the appropriate earned credentials, and provide instruction in their areas of expertise.  The College requires adjunct faculty members to hold the same credentials as full-time faculty.  Department heads, deans, and the Vice-President of Academic Affairs verify credentials for each faculty member and document them on Credentials Verification forms stored in personnel files.  Academic Affairs also stores copies.

 

According to a national study by NACUBO (1998), the median ratio of FTE students per FTE staff at public two-year colleges is 19 to 1.  The official student FTE in fall 2003 was 2,781, and in spring 2004, it was 2,698.  The FTE faculty during these same terms was 152.2.  Student/faculty ratios were approximately 18.3 and 17.7, excluding academic and student support staff.  Spartanburg Community College is within the average range as defined by NACUBO’S study.

 

During fall term 2003, full-time faculty taught 56% of all course sections. During spring term 2004, full-time faculty taught 52% of all course sections.  [Full-Time Faculty vs. Part-Time Faculty Comparison]  

 

CORE REQUIREMENT 2.8

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Douglas B (1998), Comparative Financial Statistics for Public Two-Year-Colleges: Fiscal Year 1998.  Washington, DC.  NACUBO

 

SACS Liaison Office

Roster of Instructional Staff

 

 

Full-Time Faculty vs. Part-Time Faculty Comparison

 

 

2.9       The institution, through ownership or formal arrangements or agreements, provides and supports student and faculty access and user privileges to adequate library collections as well as to other learning/information resources consistent with the degrees offered.  These collections and resources are sufficient to support all its educational, research, and public service programs. (Learning Resources and Services)

 

   Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College is an educational institution. The Spartanburg Community College library located in the Tracy Gaines Learning Resource Center, supports all the College’s educational programs. The library, the main repository for the College’s learning resources, houses a large collection of books, audiovisual materials, paper journals, and electronic resources.  Other areas on campus have small collections of learning resources particular to their area of focus. The library provides a variety of user-oriented library services designed to meet the needs of all academic, continuing education, transitional studies, and community interest programs offered at Spartanburg Community College.  The library supports these College academic programs by developing a library collection in a systematic and comprehensive manner, making these materials easily available, and assisting students, faculty, and staff in the use of these materials. [Policy IV-50]

 

The library’s current, comprehensive learning resources, developed with faculty input, are readily available and accessible to faculty, staff, and students. The library collection and other learning and information resources support the mission and goals of Spartanburg Community College and are consistent with the degrees offered at Spartanburg Community College. The library’s mission statement emphasizes this support.  Each year, the library continues to develop its library collection to support the needs of each academic program by purchasing library materials covering subjects in each of these areas.  Faculty and professional staff are responsible for the selection of library materials as outlined in Procedure IV-50.2, Acquisition of Library Materials. An example of this faculty input is evidenced by the library’s Department Head interviews. Institutional reports, user surveys, and College publications report on the usefulness and relevance of the library’s resources and collections in supporting the curriculum. The library is open sixty-three hours per week on a regular schedule. Electronic resources are available to faculty and students seven days a week, twenty-four hours a day. [STC Library website]

 

At the end of the 2003/2004 academic year, the library held 41,707 items:  38,173 books, 3,534 audiovisual materials, and 283 current subscriptions to paper journal titles. The library also has access to over 35,213 e-book (electronic book) titles. The library’s online public catalog, Unicorn, provides bibliographic access to the library collection and to other on-campus departmental holdings.  The library provides access to over 20 electronic databases containing over 12,600 periodical titles, which supply subject coverage for all Spartanburg Community College programs. Most databases have full-text periodical and newspaper coverage. The library also makes heavy use of resources available on the Internet, and library instruction includes training in identifying and evaluating these resources. 

The library’s collections are comparable in size and type to the collections available to students and faculty at its peer institutions. [Library Peer Group Comparison (Collection Size)].

 

Recent visiting teams from professional accreditation agencies that evaluate specific curriculum programs have also judged the library’s collections and resources as more than adequate.  Programs recently evaluated included Engineering Technology (ABET), Nursing (ADN), Practical Nursing, Radiologic Sciences (Radiography/Radiation Therapy), Pharmacy Technician, Culinary Arts, Expanded Duty Dental Assisting (formerly Dental Assisting), and Business Technology.

 

Library patrons have expressed their satisfaction with the library and learning resources collection. Library patron surveys since 2000 show that 90-97% of those surveyed indicated satisfaction. In addition, 87.7% of students surveyed for the March 2004 ACT Student Opinion Survey responded they were satisfied with the Library/Learning Resources Center facilities and services.

 

Faculty, staff, students (including distance learning students), and community patrons can access all databases in their offices and homes. The Library website http://library.stcsc.edu serves as a gateway for use of the library's resources, both print and online.  Patrons use the library web page frequently during non-traditional hours, with 49% of the use taking place during non-work hours and 20% on weekends. The most heavily used section of the web page is the full-text database area.  The College provides access to evaluated research material in an organized manner that facilitates patron use. The library staff and faculty have developed specialized research guides for each STC program. The research guides are easily accessible both on and off campus through the library web page. In addition, the library's electronic resources are available seven days a week, twenty-four hours per day. As part of the library’s support for distance learning, the specific job duty of one of the faculty librarians is to support and enhance services for distance education students. The library provides reference service during the regular hours the library is open either in person, via telephone, or online using the Ask-a-Librarian reference service.  [STC Library website]

 

The library has cooperative agreements with local and regional libraries to provide students and faculty with access to a wide variety of resources in both paper and electronic formats. The library participates in and subscribes to numerous sources of information and multiple interlibrary loan services. The library is also an active member in several local and national resource-sharing consortia, including Online Computer Library Center (OCLC) via Southeastern Library Network (SOLINET), the South Carolina Library Network, Partnership Among South Carolina Academic Libraries (PASCAL) and The South Carolina Library and Information Services Consortium (SCILS). Students, staff, and faculty may obtain statewide borrowing cards which provide access to materials at four-year public and private colleges, as well as the other fifteen technical colleges in South Carolina, via a statewide library borrowing agreement. In the 2003/2004 academic year, the STC library processed 437 interlibrary loan transactions for faculty, staff, and students. 

                                               

CORE REQUIREMENT 2.9

Documentation

SOLINET/OCLC Agreement

SCILS

Statewide Borrowing Agreement

STC Library Website

STC Library Peer Group Comparison Report (Collection Size)

Library Acquisition Report

Library Patron Survey

Comprehensive Site Analysis Report: Summary

STC Library Database Statistics

STC Library Department Head Interviews

Engineering Technology (ABET) Accreditation Library Report

Nursing (ADN) Accreditation Library Report

Practical Nursing Accreditation Library Report

Radiologic Sciences Accreditation Library Report

Culinary Arts Accreditation Report

Expanded Duty Dental Assisting (formerly Dental Assisting) Accreditation Library Report

Business Technology Accreditation Library Report

March 2004 ACT Student Opinion Survey

Library Mission Statement (p. 78 of Student Handbook 2004-2005
POL IV-50

PRO IV-50.2 Acquisition of Library Materials

PRO IV-50.3 Library Service

STC Library Report to State Library 2003-2004

2.10     The institution provides student support programs, services, and activities consistent with its mission that promote student learning and enhance the development of its students. (Student Support Services)

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College provides support programs and services that are consistent with its mission to promote student learning and “assist students in achieving their professional and personal goals.” Spartanburg Community College employs qualified personnel in the Student Affairs and the Academic Affairs divisions to ensure the quality and effectiveness of these programs.  All professional staff members hold appropriate degrees or possess the appropriate combination of education, work experience, and/or certifications to hold these positions. (See Comprehensive Standards 3.7.1 for faculty credentials and 3.9.3 for staff credentials.)

 

Spartanburg Community College provides support programs and services through two divisions, Student Affairs and Academic Affairs.

 

Student Affairs

The division of Student Affairs helps to promote student learning and the enhancement of students’ growth and development by providing student support programs, activities, and services consistent with the mission. These programs and services include assistance with admissions, financial aid, career planning, student activities, and programs for students with disabilities.

 

Enrollment Services

Admissions, Counseling, and Disability Services, Financial Aid and Veterans Services, and Records

Admissions, Counseling, and Disability Services

The Admissions and Counseling Department plays a vital role in promoting student success by fostering academic, career, and personal development.  The Admissions and Counseling Department admits to the College all applicants who can benefit from available learning opportunities and designs and implements intake, support, and transition services that effectively impact identified student goals and outcomes. Specific function areas of the department include the following: general college information, admissions services, pre-admissions career services, counseling services, a curriculum college orientation course, and a comprehensive program of student activities.

 

The Office of Disability Services promotes student learning and enhances the development of students with disabilities by providing accommodations and assuring that program accessibility is provided to students with disabilities in a timely and effective matter. This office follows the guidelines and requirements of the Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended in 1992. This office acts as an advocate for students with disabilities and as a technical advisor to faculty and staff on issues of reasonable accommodation and auxiliary aids and services.

 

Spartanburg Community College offers services to students who are hearing or visually impaired by providing an assistive technology lab equipped with a variety of state-of-the art equipment. (See Comprehensive Standard 3.4.9.)

Financial Aid and Veterans Assistance

STC maintains a financial aid office, as required by federal regulations, that coordinates the delivery to students of all funds from all sources—grants, loans, and scholarships.  The department manages a variety of programs that provide funds and benefits for students. The financial aid office also provides services such as counseling, assistance in completing applications, and federal work-study awards. 

 

During the Fall 2004 term, the financial aid office staff disbursed 2,117 applications, received 11,074 telephone calls, and provided services to 8,162 appointments/walk-ins.  Student surveys regarding the services that this office provided indicated a 98% student satisfaction rate.

 

The Veterans Affairs Office coordinates services for VA students, active duty service personnel, and eligible dependents. (See Comprehensive Standards 3.4.9 and 4.1.)

Records

The Records Office maintains accurate and confidential student records, grades, transcripts, and graduation information.  The office is dedicated to safeguarding the accuracy, integrity, and security of a student’s academic record. This office actively participates in the College’s enrollment effort. Specific function areas of the department include the following: registration, drop/adds, student information changes, grades, transcripts, enrollment verification, transfer credit tracking, college withdrawals, clearinghouse reporting,  Department of Defense (DOD) reporting, error cleanup, managing active and inactive student records, managing archived records College-wide, graduation applications, graduation awards, and database cleanups. (See Comprehensive Standard 3.4.9.)

 

Student Support Services

AIM Center (Federally funded), Career Planning and Placement, Cooperative Services for the Deaf and Blind, Counseling and Career Development, Student  Activities, and Success Network (Federally funded).

           

AIM Center

The Carl D. Perkins Vocational-Technology Education Act of 1998 funds the AIM Center. The program offers services to enhance the development of students by providing personal and career counseling and financial assistance for books, childcare, educational supplies, and transportation. The program supports individuals who are economically disadvantaged, have limited English proficiency, or are single parents, displaced homemakers, single pregnant women, individuals with disabilities, or students enrolled in non-traditional programs.

 
An internal student survey relating to the services offered by the staff indicated that 94% of the respondents were satisfied with the services provided by the staff.  The comments included that the staff is courteous, knowledgeable, and willing to assist students in any way necessary. (See Comprehensive Standard 3.4.9.)


Career Planning and Placement

The Career Planning and Placement Office promotes the total growth and development of its students and graduates with comprehensive employment opportunity services. These services include the following: career assessment, resume preparation assistance, job search skills training, job readiness workshops, individual and group counseling related to job preparation, and access to electronic and hard-copy job vacancy listings and to a career resource library. The center links the College’s academic and career programs to business and industry and facilitates the transition of students into the world of work. The center also coordinates the co-operative education program, which combines classroom experience with work experience related to the student’s program of study.

 

The Career Planning and Placement Office and the AIM Center collaborate each year with a series of job readiness workshops on topics including resume writing, interviewing skills, and dressing for success.

 

During the Fall 2004 term, the Career Planning and Placement Office staff assisted 837 student/graduate walk-ins, 250 student/graduate appointments, 884  job information seekers, and 62 students with inventory test reviews. (See Comprehensive Standards 3.4.9 and 4.1.)

 

Cooperative Program for the Deaf and the Blind

The Cooperative Program for the Deaf and the Blind was established through an agreement between STC and The South Carolina School for the Deaf and the Blind (SCSDB). Through this unique program, individuals who are deaf, hard of hearing, blind, or visually impaired may choose from the full range of academic programs available at STC.  The office of the Coordinator of the Cooperative Program is housed on the STC campus to ensure that support services are readily available.  This office promotes student learning and enhances the development of students with disabilities by providing accommodations and support services. These support services include interpreting services, note takers, readers, Braille/large print, assistive technology training, basic tutoring services, and specialized advisement/advocacy. 

 

During the Spring 2004 term, the Cooperative Program for the Deaf and the Blind surveyed students regarding satisfaction with services. The satisfaction rating was 92%.  (See Comprehensive Standard 3.4.9.)

 

Student Activities

The mission of Student Activities at STC is to complement the in-class experience by enhancing students’ lives outside the classroom through campus involvement. Student Activities encourages students to participate in the programs which stress leadership and training, service to the College and community, self-directed activity, the experience of sharing interests, and the opportunity to interact with those of different cultural backgrounds. (See Comprehensive Standard 3.4.9.)

 

Success Network

The Success Network program objectives are to provide opportunities for

academic development by assisting students with basic college requirements

and to motivate students toward successful completion of their postsecondary

education through graduation or transfer. These services enhance the

development of its students: tutorial services; personal, academic, and career

counseling; support services for student with disabilities; direct financial

assistance to qualified students; mentoring; workshops and seminars;

assistance in transfer to four-year institutions; cultural enrichment activities; and

community service activities.

 

Total number of student visits during the Fall 2004 semester was 1,015. This number also includes students receiving all support services (tutoring, counseling, workshops, cultural activities, campus tours, disability services, and assisted labs).  Students received a total of 539.25 contact hours in Peer Tutoring, and 3,840 (duplicated) hours in Counseling services. The Success Network is funded under TRIO programs and maintains a minimum of 150 active participants at all times.  (See Comprehensive Standard 3.4.9.) 

 

Academic Affairs

The division of Academic Affairs helps to promote student learning by providing academic programs and services that enhance student growth and development. These programs and services include assistance with student advisement, transitional studies, distance learning courses, library resources, course selection, and tutorial and testing services. The division of Academic Affairs supports student learning by providing the following services:

 

Academic Advising Center

The Academic Advising Center seeks to facilitate successful student outcomes and promote student independence through various academic advisement and training services.

 

Currently over 500 different students receive specialized services. Primarily, students testing into 031/032 (transitional) level courses and all newly enrolled Arts and Sciences students receive a variety of training and orientation services related to academic advisement and independence in     course scheduling and registration.  During the Spring 2004 term 2,816 students received services including individual advising sessions, campus orientation sessions, small group training in course selection, class scheduling, and independent registration via the College’s Web Advisor Program. 

 

Intended student outcomes are to maintain the student’s active College enrollment until completion of the selected course of study and to teach students independence with course selection, class scheduling, and term registration.  The retention percentage for students with advising center placement was 83% for the Spring 2004 term, up from 70% for the Spring 2002 term.  Overall, student satisfaction with all services ranged from 3.53 to 3.97 with an average of 3.78 on a 4.00 scale. (See Comprehensive Standard 3.4.9.)

 

Distance Learning

Distance Learning offers students alternative ways of taking college credit

courses using different delivery methods, including video, teleclass (compressed

video), and online.  Distance learning provides students with flexible options for

where and when they work on their courses. Distance Learning provides support

for faculty and students in these environments with appropriate equipment,

staffing, training, and services.

 

The Distance Learning Student Course Satisfaction Survey 2003-2004 Program

Assessment of Effectiveness surveyed students regarding the quality of

instruction via Distance Learning. Of those 199 students responding, 79%

indicated “satisfactory” or “”better” with the quality of instruction.  Faculty

indicated their 100% satisfaction with the technical support supplied by Distance

Learning in the 2003-2004 Distance Learning Faculty Support Survey.

 

Library

The library resources support the academic and personal needs of students,

staff, and faculty as well as the business and industrial communities. The library

assists students in achieving their professional and personal goals by providing

high quality information services. 

 

The library’s resources are further enhanced by online computer access to the

collections of the South Carolina State Library, Spartanburg County Public

Library, and other public and academic libraries. Library orientations are

available upon request for either individuals or groups. The library provides

reference services in person, via e-mail, and by telephone. During the Fall 2004

term, 30,416 individuals used the library facilities. (See Comprehensive Standard

3.5.1 and 3.4.9.)

 

The Tutorial Learning Center (TLC) and the Open Computer Lab (OCL)

Through its tutoring services, the Tutorial Learning Center supports students’ academic success in the College curriculum. Qualified tutors offer one-on-one and group tutorials to all STC students on a walk-in basis. Tutoring subjects include reading, grammar, writing across the curriculum, mathematics, chemistry, biology, and accounting. Currently, all tutors hold at least a four-year degree in their fields; many serve or have served as instructors at STC. In addition to academic tutoring, the Tutorial Learning Center offers computer-assisted instruction as well as CD-ROM and video presentations in a variety of course-related subjects.  Eight computers with Internet access are available for student use.

 

The Open Computer Lab houses forty-five state-of-the-art computers, providing STC students with a location and a learning atmosphere in which to use computers for academic purposes.  Computer lab assistants are readily available to provide guidance and support for students with computer-based assignments. In addition, periodically scheduled computer workshops are designed to facilitate new STC students’ basic computer skills. The Open Computer Lab also assists students enrolled in computer-related academic programs, from basic computer functions to programming. Twenty course-specific software programs are available in the lab as well as Microsoft Office and Internet access.   During the Fall 2004 term, 1,940 individuals paid a total of 20,426 visits to the TLC/OCL.  An average of 10.5 visits per student indicates student satisfaction with the services offered. (See Comprehensive Standard 3.4.9.)

 

Testing Center

Testing Center personnel provide curriculum make-up and exemption credit tests for students and faculty. The Testing Center also provides computerized and traditional testing services for distance learning courses.  The STC Testing Center proctored 2,919 tests in Fall 2004. 

 

As a community service, the College allows students to take online and paper-pencil tests in the STC Testing Center free of charge.  The Testing Center personnel have proctored tests for students from many area colleges such as Gardner Webb University and Limestone College.  The proctors also administered tests for distance learning courses offered through out-of-state colleges, including the University of Georgia. (See Comprehensive Standard 3.4.9.)  Services are available daily, Monday through Friday, and evenings Monday through Thursday, for the convenience of both day and evening students.

 

CORE REQUIREMENT 2.10

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg Community College Student Planner & Handbook 2004-2005, pages 65-93

Advising Center, page 65

AIM Center, page 66

Cooperative Program for the Deaf and the Blind, pages 70-71

Distance Learning, pages 71-72

Financial Aid and Veterans Benefits, pages 75-76

Library, pages 78-79

Open Computer Lab, page 80

Records, pages 83-84

Services for Students with Disabilities, pages 84-85

Student Activities, page 85

Student Services, pages 90-91

Success Network, page 91

Transitional Studies, page 92

Testing Center, page 93

Tutorial Learning Center, page 93

 

 

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog, pages 30-35

 

 

Supporting Data for Core Requirement 2.10 and Comprehensive Standard 3.9.3 

 

SACS Liaison Office

2.11     The institution has a sound financial base and demonstrated financial stability, and adequate physical resources to support the mission of the institution and the scope of its programs and services. 

 

            The member institution provides the following financial statements: (a) an institutional audit (or Standard Review Report issued in accordance with Statements on Standards for Accounting and Review Services issued by the AICPA for those institutions audited as part of a systemwide or statewide audit) and written institutional management letter for the most recent fiscal year prepared by an independent certified public accountant and/or an appropriate governmental auditing agency employing the appropriate audit (or Standard Review Report) guide; (b) a statement of financial position of unrestricted net assets, exclusive of plant assets and plant-related debt, which represents the change in unrestricted net assets attributable to operations for the most recent year; and, (c) an annual budget that is preceded by sound planning, is subject to sound fiscal procedures, and is approved by the governing board.

 

            Audit requirements for applicant institutions may be found in the Commission policy entitled “Accreditation Procedures for Applicant Institutions. (Resources)

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College (STC) defines having a sound financial base, demonstrated financial stability, and adequate physical resources as the ability to provide postsecondary educational programs and services that are accessible, affordable, equitable, and state-of-the-art. [STC Mission Statement]

 

Institutional Audit

Prior to FY 2002, external auditors prepared the College’s financial statements. With the implementation of Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) Standards Number 34 and 35, STC now prepares its own financial statements that are audited by external auditors. For the past three years, STC has received an Unqualified Report from our auditors.  Following are institutional reports and, as needed, management letters for the past three years: 

            Independent Auditor’s Report, Financial Statements for the Year Ending:

                        June 30, 2002

                        June 30, 2003

                        June 30, 2004

 

Our financial statements are audited “in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America and the standards applicable to financial audits contained in Government Auditing Standards, issued by the Comptroller General of the United States and the revised August, 1994, State Board Audit Guide.” [Auditor’s Letter]  Financial statements are also prepared in accordance with the Financial Reporting Guide for the South Carolina Technical College System.

 

Annual Budget

STC prepares an annual budget preceded by sound planning, subject to sound fiscal procedures, and approved by the governing board.  STC Procedure III.10.13, Budget Process, details the timeline and steps taken to develop and approve the budget. The procedure states, “Preparation of the College’s annual budget is a component of the College’s planning process. Budget preparation is to be preceded by departmental and divisional annual improvement planning. Departmental budget requests should be based on proposed activities that are identified through assessment and effectiveness measures.” [Budget, Budget Meeting Minutes, AIP 2004]  The Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education approves the budget each year. [Commission Meeting Minutes] Details of our budget must also be submitted to Spartanburg County, [Spartanburg County Budget] the South Carolina Technical College System, [State Detail Budget 2005-2006] as well as through the Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics (NCES). [Finance IPEDS Survey]

 

Schedule of Changes in Unrestricted Net Assets

Audited financial statements include the Statement of Net Assets and the Statement of Revenues, Expenses, and Changes in Net Assets. These are available in the annual Independent Auditor’s Report. [Auditor’s Report]  A statement of financial position of unrestricted net assets, exclusive of plant assets and plant-related debt, which represents the change in unrestricted net assets attributable to operations for the most recent fiscal year has also been prepared. [SACS URNA 2004]

 

Further evidence may be found in SACS Comprehensive Standard 3.10.1 and 3.10.7 to demonstrate adequate financial and physical resources.

 

CORE REQUIREMENT 2.11

Documentation

STC Mission

 

Independent Auditor’s Report, Financial Statements For the Year Ended:

June 30, 2002

June 30, 2003

June 30, 2004

 

GASB 34/35

 

Spartanburg County Budget

 

Financial Reporting Guide for the South Carolina Technical College System

 

Procedure III.10.13 Budget Process

 

Budget for:

FY 02-03

FY 03-04

FY 04-05

 

Budget Working Papers and Meeting Minutes for FY 04-05 Budget

 

Annual Improvement Plan, FY 04-05

 

Commission Meeting Minutes showing approval of:

02-03 Budget

03-04 Budget

04-05 Budget

 

Integrated Post Secondary Education Data System (IPEDS) Report for FY 03-04

 

State Budget Detail

 

Schedule of Changes in Unrestricted Net Assets For The Year Ended June 30, 2004

 

2.12     The institution has developed an acceptable Quality Enhancement Plan and demonstrates that the   plan is part of an ongoing planning and evaluation process. (Quality Enhancement Plan).  (Not applicable for the Compliance Certification submitted by institutions.

 

 

Section 3  COMPREHENSIVE STANDARDS
 

 Institutional Mission, Governance,
 And Effectiveness

 

3.1  Institutional Mission

 

3.1.1    The institution has a clear and comprehensive mission statement that guides it; is approved by the governing board; is periodically reviewed by the board; and is communicated to the institution=s constituencies.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Policy Statement I-60 states that Spartanburg Community College will operate under a broad-based system of institutional effectiveness.  The College will use its mission as the foundation for planning and evaluation, will employ college-wide assessment, and will demonstrate and document use of the results of the planning and evaluation process for the improvement of both its educational and support programs. 

 

The President’s Council and the Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education approve the College’s mission, vision, and goals.  They forward any changes to the mission statement to the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education for subsequent review and approval.

 

The Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education approved the most recent mission statement on January 13, 2003.  The Spartanburg County Commission forwarded the mission statement to the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education who approved it on June 5, 2003.  All faculty and staff received a campus

e-mail notifying them of this revision and approval. The new statement modifies the number of curriculum students from “2,500-4,000” to “4,000-6,000” and the number of continuing education students from “9,000-12,000” to “12,000-18,000.”  On November 17, 2003, the Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education reaffirmed the College’s mission and goals.  

 

In the previous year, the President’s Council submitted the mission statement to the commission on January 14, 2002, with no recommended changes.

 

Every five years the College completes an extensive review of its mission, vision, and goals and devises strategies to achieve its goals.  The College Strategic Plan describes the results of this review.  The Strategic Plan includes components on the College’s mission, vision, five-year goals, five-year strategies, and effectiveness measures.  The most recent Strategic Plan extends through 2005. In 1998 – 1999, the College conducted a community-based survey that included high school juniors, area businesses/industries, focus groups, and citizens, and presented the findings to the President’s Council as well as to the commission.

 

The President’s Council and the Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education review the College’s Strategic Plan annually to assure that the College’s mission and vision are appropriate. On September 15, 2003, the President’s Council presented the Annual Improvement Plan to the Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education. In the previous year, the President’s Council presented the Annual Improvement Plan to the commission on September 16, 2002.

 

The College’s mission statement is published in the College catalog and on the College’s website.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.1.1

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog, page 5

 

 

POL I-60

 

 

Area Commission Minutes

January 13, 2003

September 15, 2003

November 17, 2003

September 16, 2002

January 14, 2002

 

 

Campus email dated June 5, 2003

 

 

Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education By-Laws and Special Rules Of Order, June 21,2004

 

 

2005 Strategic Plan

 

 

Booklets:

Preparing the Work Force for the 21st Century

1998 Citizen Survey

1998 Work Force Development Survey

1998 High School Survey

 

Planning and Development Office

 

3.2  Governance and Administration

 

3.2.1    The governing board of the institution is responsible for the selection and the evaluation of the chief executive officer.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  The duties of the Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education are derived from its powers as specified in the enabling legislation under Section 2, Act 906, April 7, 1962, of the General Statutes of South Carolina.  This legislation mandates that the commission shall

1)     Participate in the selection and hiring of a president or chief executive officer in accordance with the existing state laws and regulations.

2)     Hire a president by affirmative vote of a majority of the membership of the full commission.

 

The South Carolina Code of Laws, Section 59-53-52, as amended in 1976, mandates that the Chairman of the State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education or a designated member shall serve on any committee charged with the search for a state technical college president.  It is the responsibility of the Chairman of a technical college area commission to promptly notify the Chairman of the State Board of a formally announced retirement or termination of the college president.

 

At the November 20, 1995, meeting of the commission, Dr. Jack Powers, President of Spartanburg Community College, announced his retirement effective June 30, 1996. 

 

At the January 15, 1996, meeting of the commission, Dr. Snoddy introduced as guest the Executive Director of the State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education and the Executive Director of Human Resources Management of the State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education. The Commission went into Executive Session for the purpose of discussing the selection of a new president.

 

On Monday, February 12, 1996, the commission scheduled a special called meeting to discuss the Presidential Profile.  The Associate Executive Director for State Human Resources attended the meeting as a guest.  At the March 18, 1996, commission meeting, an update was given on the presidential search.  On June 5, 6, and 7, 1996, the Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education met in executive session to interview final candidates for the presidential position.  Following the three-day meeting in executive session, the chairman called for an open session during which time a motion was made that the commission submit an offer for the presidential position at Spartanburg Community College.  On June 10, 1996, the commission made the presidential announcement to all faculty and staff.

 

Based on provisions of Section 59-53-52 (8) of the 1976 South Carolina Code of Laws, as amended, technical college presidents are employed at the will of the respective technical college area commission.  Upon selection of a president and after securing the necessary approvals, the area commission shall communicate to the selected candidate a letter of appointment addressing all applicable terms, conditions, and provisions of employment.

 

Under state board policy 8-2-111-c, college presidents will have a performance appraisal on at least an annual basis by the respective area commission.  The commission chairman completes an annual evaluation of the president in August and sends a letter and a copy of the evaluation to the Executive Director at the State Technical System office.  Copies of the letters and evaluations are maintained in the president’s office.  

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.2.1

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education Bylaws and Special Rules of Order
Article VI, Section A 1 and Article 2, page 13 

 

 

State Policy 8-2-111 

 

 

Model Letter of Appointment

 

 

Commission Meeting Minutes

November 20, 1995

January 15, 1996

February 12, 1996

March 18, 1996

June 5, 6, and 7, 1996

 

 

Evaluations of President

 

 Human Resources Office

South Carolina Code of Laws 59-53-52, #8

 

 

3.2.2    The legal authority and operating control of the institution are clearly defined for the following areas within the institution=s governance structure:

 

3.2.2.1 the institution=s mission;

3.2.2.2 the fiscal stability of the institution;

3.2.2.3 institutional policy, including policies concerning related and affiliated corporate entities and all auxiliary services;

3.2.2.4 related foundations (athletic, research, etc.) and other corporate entities whose primary purpose is to support the institution and/or its programs.

 

   Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  South Carolina Code of Laws, Section 59-53-52, defines the powers and duties of area college commissions, specifically stating in items 10, 12, and 15 that the area commission shall

 

establish, promulgate and enforce reasonable rules and regulations for the operation of their facility…expend any funds received in any manner consistent with their approved budget…keep full and accurate accounts of receipts and expenditures and make monthly reports in accordance with uniform procedures established for the system, and within ninety days following the close of the fiscal year cause a complete audit of institutional affairs to be made by an independent certified public accountant… 

 

As established by the SC general assembly act (ACT 906), the Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education has the responsibility for the development and operation of Spartanburg Community College, and the commission’s primary function is the determination of local policies, reserving to the administration and faculty the responsibilities for implementing policy through appropriate procedures and controls.

 

The President of Spartanburg Community College shall have full authority and responsibility for the operation of the College.

 

The president develops the organizational structure of the College, properly correlating channels of communication, authority, and responsibility; establishes operational procedures to be followed by the College staff; recommends operational policy to commission members and informs them on all matters pertaining to activities of the College that may affect operational control, and recommends necessary administrative and instructional changes.  The president, in turn, delegates the development and implementation of departmental-level policies and the duties for functional areas of the College to vice-presidential-level administrators.  Vice presidents report to the president.  Each vice president oversees an organizational unit of the College and fulfills the responsibilities delegated to him or her as defined in individual position descriptions. The Executive Vice President of Business Affairs is responsible to the president for all College fiscal affairs, including budget planning, management, and control as well as the supervision of areas such as the College bookstore and vending which are the College’s only auxiliary services.

 

Policy III-10 states that it is the policy of Spartanburg Community College to establish and maintain procedures relating to fiscal support that assure College assets and departmental duties are managed in a responsible manner.

 

Although the South Carolina Code of Laws does not specifically mention mission, the code designates the commission with general responsibility on governance of the institution.  This is further supported in the Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education’s bylaws, which state, “it [the Commission] possesses all the powers of a body corporate for the purpose created by, or that may exist under provisions of the law.”

 

Policy Statement I-60 states that Spartanburg Community College will operate under a broad-based system of institutional effectiveness.  The College will use its mission as the foundation for planning and evaluation.

 

The President’s Council and the Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education approve the College’s mission, vision, and goals and forward these to the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education for review and approval.  The Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education approved the most recent mission statement on January 13, 2003, and forwarded it to the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education who approved it on June 5, 2003. The new statement modifies the number of curriculum students from “2,500-4,000” to “4,000-6,000” and the number of continuing education students from “9,000-12,000” to “12,000-18,000”.  On November 17, 2003, the Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education reaffirmed the College’s mission and goals.   In the previous year, the mission statement was submitted to the commission on January 14, 2002, with no recommended changes.

 

The Spartanburg Community College Foundation is the College’s only related corporate entity and, as defined by its statement of purpose, exists for the primary purpose of exclusively supporting and advancing Spartanburg Community College and its programs. The STC Foundation is a non-profit 501(c)(3) Internal Revenue Code Corporation that is separate from the College. The Foundation’s legal authority comes from a charter issued by the South Carolina Secretary of State. The STC Foundation is operationally controlled by its own articles of incorporation, bylaws, and a written agreement with the College. These documents clearly define the legal authority, governance structure, and operating control of the STC Foundation and its relationship to the College.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.2.2

Documentation

On-Campus Location

POL I-60

 

 

Commission Minutes

January 13, 2003

January 14, 2002

 

 

POL III-10

 

 

Organizational Chart

 

 

Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education By-Laws and Special Rules Of Order

Article IV, Section A

Article IV, Section B-1

Article X, Section 2A

 

 

SC State Law 59-53-52

 

 

Job Descriptions

 

 Human Resources Office

STC Foundation Articles of Incorporation

 

 

STC Foundation By-Laws

 

 

STC/STC Foundation Agreement

 

 

3.2.3    The board has a policy addressing conflict of interest for its members.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Article VI, Section 2 of the bylaws of the Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education, revised and adopted January 13, 2003, addresses the issue of conflict of interest and requires that a commission member shall abstain from voting on any question or taking any official action on an issue that involves a possible conflict of interest.   The bylaws also mandate that the minutes of the meeting show that the member abstained from voting on that issue.   Furthermore, the bylaws define the word “interest” as it relates to the commission members and the College, and the section also delineates the types of relationships for which a commission member could be construed as having an interest.   

 

In addition to the bylaws, College Policy III-30, entitled Conflict of Interest in Contracting, states, “College employees, Commission members and their immediate family members are prohibited from entering into contractual relationships with the College.”

 

Also, The Ethics Reform Act of 1991 covers state organizations. The Ethics Reform Act “provides certain standards for public officials and public employees, centered around the prohibition against the use of public position to affect the officeholder’s economic interests, those of family members, or individuals or businesses with whom the person is associated.”

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.2.3

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education By-Laws and Special Rules Of Order, January 13, 2003, Article VI, Section 2, page 14

 

 

POL III-30

 

 

SC State Ethics Commission Annual Report

 

 

3.2.4    The governing board is free from undue influence from political, religious, or other external bodies, and protects the institution from such influence. 

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  The Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education, which is the governing body of the College, has addressed the freedom of undue influence through the issuance of the Spartanburg Community College Commission Handbook. Upon acceptance of a position as a commission board member, the member agrees to the policies, as stated in the commission handbook, as referenced by Article VI, Section 2, Conflict of Interest. The current commission received copies of the commission handbook during the Commission Meeting held on January 12, 2004.  Commission members signed a Conflict of Interest Compliance Certification that states

 

Commission members serve the public trust and have a clear obligation to fulfill their responsibilities in a manner consistent with this fact….The integrity of Spartanburg Community College must be protected at all times….Every Commission member has the responsibility to ensure that the Commission is made aware of situations that involve personal, familial, or business relationships that potentially could be construed to affect their independent, unbiased judgment in light of their decision-making authority and responsibility.

 

The section of the commission handbook entitled Trustee Commitment states, “Trustees also defend the College from outside interference by protecting integrity and independence, by refuting false rumors and by providing the external leadership the College needs.”

 

Policy VI-380 states that “all employees, as well as Commission members, will perform their duties and conduct themselves in an ethical and accountable manner.”

 

Policy II-100 states that “it is the policy of the College to take a neutral position on all bipartisan political issues or controversial public issues.”

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.2.4

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education By-Laws and Special Rules Of Order

          Article VI, Section 2

 

 

Commission Meeting Minutes, January 12, 2004

 

 

List of Board Members

 

 

Conflict of Interest Compliance Certification forms

 

 

Policy Statements VI-380

 

 

Policy Statements II-100

 

 

The Commission Handbook, page 5

 

 

3.2.5    Members of the governing board can be dismissed only for cause and by due process. 

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  An update was presented to the commission during the meeting held on February 16, 2004, and approved at the March 15, 2004, meeting.  This update states, “the Commissioners by a two-thirds majority vote may recommend to the governor to remove a Commissioner from office because of dereliction of duties and responsibilities, moral turpitude, or financial malfeasance.”

 

Article IV of the commission bylaws states that “a regular member may be dismissed only for cause and through due process.”  No commission member has been removed for any of the reasons stated above.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.2.5

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg Community College Commission Handbook (2003) 

 

President’s Office

Commission Meeting Minutes, February 16, 2004

 

 

Commission Meeting Minutes, March 15, 2004  

Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education By-Laws and Special Rules Of Order

        Article IV, Section 2, Item J

 

 

Spartanburg County Commission for

Technical Education By-Laws and Special Rules of Order

        Article IV, Section 2, Item K

 

 

3.2.6    There is a clear and appropriate distinction, in writing and practice, between the policy-making functions of the governing board and the responsibility of the administration and faculty to administer and implement policy.  

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  The Spartanburg Commission for Technical Education bylaws state, “The President shall have the authority over and be responsible for all administrative and managerial aspects of the development and operation of the College.  The President shall submit all recommended policies to the Commission for approval.”

 

In addition, the bylaws state that “the area commission is a legislative body whose primary function is the determination of local policies, reserving to the administration and faculty the responsibility for implementing policy through appropriate procedures and controls.”  

 

Procedure III-60.1 explains the responsibility for developing, reviewing, and administering policies and procedures:

 

The responsible President’s Council Member and President will review

policies and procedures annually. [The President’s Council is made up of the five vice-presidents and the President of the College.]  The Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education must approve policy deletions, revisions, or additions.  The responsible President’s Council Member and the President approve procedure deletions, revisions, and additions. 

 

An example of the separation between policy-making and the administration of policy through College procedures follows:  Policy II-40, Hazardous Weather, states, “It is the policy of Spartanburg Community College for the President to close the College when there is extreme weather or other specified emergency conditions that would expose faculty, staff and students to harmful or unsafe conditions.”  This policy was approved by the Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education in 1999.  Since that time, the commission has not taken any action concerning hazardous weather.  The commission has given administration of this policy to the president.  The president governs this and other policies through procedures that are reviewed and approved by the President’s Council. 

 

As an example of a change in procedure and the administration process, an inclement weather procedure needed revision (after several weather closings in 2003/2004) in order to give specific details for the making up of canceled classes.

 

The President’s Council received and approved the revised procedure.  The minutes of the Academic Affairs Staff meeting of April 5, 2004, state, “The hazardous weather procedure (as it relates to adjuncts) was approved by the President’s Council with discussion.  The Vice President for Academic Affairs shared with the group that documentation must be maintained and kept on file by each dean.  Consistency among departments must be maintained.”

 

To provide for liaison between the administration and faculty, Spartanburg Community College has developed organizations to address faculty concerns.  These include a Faculty Assembly whose purpose is to provide an effective, efficient means for faculty to achieve its agreed-upon goals, and a Faculty Board operating under the bylaws of the Faculty Assembly that conducts regular business of the Assembly and submits recommendations to the Assembly for approval.  Procedure I-20.1 refers to the Faculty Assembly and Faculty Board. 

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.2.6

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education By-Laws and Special Rules Of Order

Article VII, Sections C and D

Article IV, Section 1B1

 

 

PRO III.60.1

POL II-40

PRO I-20.1

 

 

President’s Council Minutes April 5, 2004

 

 

Academic Affairs Staff Minutes April 5, 2004

 

 

Commission Minutes 1999 – 2004 

President’s Office

 

3.2.7    The institution has a clearly defined and published organizational structure that delineates responsibility for the administration of policies.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College provides a clearly defined and published organizational structure/chart that delineates administrative responsibilities. 

 

As established by the SC general assembly (ACT 906), the Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education has the responsibility for the development and operation of Spartanburg Community College with the primary function of determining local policies, reserving to the administration and faculty the responsibilities for implementing policy through appropriate procedures and controls. 

 

The commission appoints the President of Spartanburg Community College who has full authority and responsibility for the operation of the College under the policies, rules, and regulations of the Spartanburg County Commission.  The president develops the organizational structure of the College, properly correlating channels of communication, authority and responsibility, establishes operational procedures to be followed by the College staff, recommends operational policy to the commission and informs them on all matters pertaining to activities of the College that may affect operational control, and recommends necessary administrative and instructional changes.  The president, in turn, delegates the development and implementation of departmental level policies and the duties for functional areas of the College to the five vice-presidential level administrators.  Vice presidents report to the president.  Each vice president oversees an organizational unit of the College and fulfills the responsibilities delegated to him or her as defined in individual position descriptions.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.2.7

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Organizational Chart

 

 

Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education By-Laws and Special Rules of Order

Article IV, Section 1-B (1)

Article X, Section 2A

 

 

Job Descriptions of President and Vice Presidents 

 

Human Resources Office

3.2.8    The institution has qualified administrative and academic officers with the experience, competence, and capacity to lead the institution.

 

  Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College employs qualified administrative and academic officers with experience, competence, and capacity to lead the institution.  Policy I-50 references the institutional officers and provides information about the location of the individual job descriptions and the officers’ primary responsibilities.  The organizational chart that is published in Public Folders further reflects areas of administrative responsibility. The president is the institution’s Chief Executive Officer (CEO).  Vice presidents report directly to the president and have primary management responsibility for one or more of the major functional areas of the College.

 

A position description form, which states the minimum requirements and job functions for the president and vice presidents, is available in the Human Resources Office.  The Human Resources Office maintains the job applications and transcripts that document official certification of experience and receipt of degrees.

 

The College adheres to an employee performance management system (EPMS) to ensure that all classified employees, educational support personnel, and institutional officers who occupy permanent positions have their performance evaluated. In compliance with state policy, all teaching faculty who occupy a permanent position shall have their performance rated on an annual basis in accordance with the Faculty Performance Management System (FPMS).  For purposes of the policy, teaching faculty includes instructors, librarians, department heads, and division deans.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.2.8

Documentation

On-Campus Location

POL I-50

 

 

Organizational Chart

 

 

Position Description Forms  

 

Human Resources

Job Applications 

 

Human Resources

PRO VI-280.1

 

 

PRO VI-280.2

 

 

Roster of Administrative and Academic Officers

 

 

3.2.9    The institution defines and publishes policies regarding appointment and employment of faculty and staff.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College recruits and hires qualified faculty, staff, and administrative officers to assist the institution in meeting its mission.   Policy VI-10, Employment, states that it is the policy of the College “to make all decisions regarding recruitment, hiring, promotion, and all other terms and conditions of employment without discrimination on grounds of race, color, creed, religion, sex, national origin, age, disability, veteran status, marital status or other factors which cannot be lawfully the basis of an employment decision.”  Spartanburg Community College is an affirmative action, equal opportunity employer and adheres to all state and federal laws applicable to employment decisions.

 

Procedure VI-10.1 states that “all personnel employed by Spartanburg Community College are considered State employees, and as such are subject to the rules and regulations of the Budget and Control Board, the Office of Human Resources (OHR), statewide policies and procedures of the State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education (SBTCE), and local policies and procedures of Spartanburg Community College.  They are designated as either (1) teaching faculty, (2) unclassified non-teaching personnel, (3) institutional officers, or (4) classified employees.”  Procedure VI-10.1 provides a detailed description of employment practices.

 

Procedure VI-170.3 provides information on position establishment and minimum requirements of vice presidents.  State Policy 8-2-111, to which the College adheres, provides information concerning the appointment and employment of the president.

 

Procedure IV-10.7 provides information on the validation of faculty credentials and states that “prior to hiring faculty, whether full-time or part-time, department heads will validate faculty credentials using the current SACS criteria.”

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.2.9

Documentation

On-Campus Location

POL VI-10

 

 

PRO VI-10.1

 

 

PRO VI-170.3

 

 

PRO IV-10.7

 

 

State Policy 8-2-111

 

 

3.2.10  The institution evaluates the effectiveness of its administrators, including the chief executive officer, on a periodic basis.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College Procedure VI-280.1, Employee Performance Management System (EPMS), states,

 

In compliance with State policy, all institutional officers, unclassified non-teaching personnel, and classified employees who occupy a permanent position shall have their performance evaluated in accordance with the Employee Performance Management System (EPMS) as approved by the State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education and the State Division of Human Resources Management of the Budget and Control Board. 

 

Furthermore, the policy states in Section V, Types of Performance Appraisals, subparagraph C. Regular (Annual) Performance Appraisal, that “all covered employees shall have a regular (annual) performance appraisal no more than ninety (90) calendar days prior to his or her established review date....   Review dates for educational support personnel and institutional officers will generally be July 1.”  Human Resources maintains performance appraisals for all employees.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.2.10

Documentation

On-Campus Location

PRO VI-280.1

 

 

EPMS’s  

 

Human Resources

3.2.11  The institution=s chief executive officer has ultimate responsibility for, and exercises appropriate administrative and fiscal control over, the institution=s intercollegiate athletics program.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  This standard is not applicable to Spartanburg Community College since the institution does not have an intercollegiate athletic program.

 

3.2.12  The institution=s chief executive officer has ultimate control of the institution=s fund-raising activities.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  The president’s position description states that he or she has decision-making over fundraising for the College.  Procedure II.150.1, Donations to the College, states that the Spartanburg Community College Foundation shall be the primary fund-raising entity on behalf of the College in seeking donations from the private sector, and the Spartanburg Community College Foundation Executive Director (foundation director) “is designated as the College official responsible for developing procedures to coordinate the seeking and acceptance of donations to Spartanburg Community College.” The foundation director reports to the president on foundation fund-raising activities. “The President and the Foundation Director are the sole officials authorized to accept donations to Spartanburg Community College.” 

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.2.12

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Position Description Form  

 

Human Resources Office

Organizational Chart

 

 

PRO II-150.1

 

 

3.2.13  Any institution-related foundation not controlled by the institution has a contractual or other formal agreement that (a) accurately describes the relationship between the institution and the foundation, and (b) describes any liability associated with that relationship.  In all cases, the institution ensures that the relationship is consistent with its mission.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  The Spartanburg Community College Foundation is a 501(c)(3) Internal Revenue Code Corporation that is separate from the College. The Foundation, as set forth in its Articles of Incorporation, exists exclusively for the benefit and advancement of the College and its objectives.  The President of the College and the Vice-President of Development of the College serve as ex-officio members of the Foundation Board.

 

A Board of Directors operating under legal authority that comes from a charter issued by the SC Secretary of State governs the Foundation. Its own articles of incorporation, bylaws, and a written agreement with the College control the operations of the Foundation. These documents clearly define the legal authority, governance structure, and operating control of the Spartanburg Community College Foundation and its relationship to the College.

 

Article I, Section 1.3 of the Spartanburg Community College Foundation Bylaws states that all the liability of the Foundation rests with the Board of Directors. “The affairs of the Foundation shall be managed and controlled by the Board of Directors….” Liability insurance protects the director and the Board of Directors.   

 

Article I, Section 1.2 of the Spartanburg Community College Foundation Bylaws states that “programs shall be administered in conjunction with, as a supplement to and consistent with the policies set forth by the Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education…”. Each year the Foundation compiles an annual report that describes activities in support of the College.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.2.13

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg Community College Foundation By-Laws

Article I, Authority, Section 1.3

Article I, Authority, Section 1.2

Article II, Membership, Section 2.1

 

 

Spartanburg Community College Foundation Articles of Incorporation

 

 

Spartanburg Community College /Spartanburg Community College Foundation Agreement

 

 

Spartanburg Community College Foundation 2003 Annual Report

 

 

Spartanburg Community College Foundation Annual Report 2002

page 5

page 10

page 11

 

 

3.2.14  The institution=s policies are clear concerning ownership of materials, compensation, copyright issues, and the use of revenue derived from the creation and production of all intellectual property. This applies to students, faculty and staff.

   Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:

The South Carolina Technical College System has a policy (3-0-100) and a procedure (3-0-100.1) addressing Intellectual Property to which the College adheres.  This policy states “except as specifically and expressly exempted herein or in the procedures developed under this policy, it is the policy of the State Board of Technical and Comprehensive Education that copyrights, patents and all other forms of intellectual property developed by any employee of a South Carolina Technical College or the System Office using agency resources is exclusive property of the respective college or the System Office. No transfer of ownership rights in copyrights, patents or other forms of intellectual property shall occur unless the college or System Office having ownership rights expressly and specifically transfer the ownership rights, in whole or in part, to the employee or other party or parties.”

 

However, Spartanburg Community College does not have a policy or procedure that applies to students. 

Plan for Compliance

The College will review and draft a policy and procedure that addresses identification of ownership of material, distribution of income, intellectual control, copyright issues, and the use of revenue derived from the creation and production of all intellectual property that applies to students, faculty, and staff. The completion of this process should be in time to bring the College in compliance with the standard prior to March 2005.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.2.14

Documentation

On-Campus Location

State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education Policies & Procedures:

3-0-100

3-0-100.1

 

 

 

3.3  Institutional Effectiveness

 

3.3.1    The institution identifies expected outcomes for its educational programs and its administrative and educational support services; assesses whether it achieves these outcomes; and provides evidence of improvement based on analysis of those results.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College’s planning process, as discussed in Core Requirement 2.5, is based on the College’s mission and aligned with the goals and strategic plan of the College.  The overall goal of the planning process is to ensure that the College is effectively achieving its mission.  The Institutional Effectiveness process at the College is primarily an internal, departmental (unit) self-assessment of how well the unit is accomplishing its essential functions.  Each unit of the College establishes its goals, strategies for achieving those goals, one or more measures (the College recommends two to three measures for each strategy), and standards for success.  The results and analyses of results are communicated to the unit’s vice-president through the Annual Improvement Plan (AIP) document. 

 

Credit Educational Programs

The College’s credit education programs are evaluated at both the course and program levels. 

Course Assessment

The College uses course assessment to evaluate the effectiveness of teaching and student learning.  The ultimate goal of assessment of courses is to determine how effectively students are mastering the course competencies.  Course assessment consists of the following components:

            ► Statistical analysis of student performance

            ► Summary review of student evaluations

            ► Review of information from external sources

            ► Review of course content by competency

            ► Analysis of teaching methods/strategies

            ► Analysis of assessment methods

            ► Analysis of individual test items and projects

            ► Summary and follow-up through an analysis of recommended changes

 

Course assessment is completed on an annual basis for every course (not section) taught.  The department head tracks course assessment.  Individual departments maintain forms within the department.  As part of the assessment of all courses, the department head and faculty meet to review the data.  The College uses summary data in both the assessment of general education and in the instructional program self-study process.

 

Faculty conducts course assessment.  “The focus of course assessment is to determine how well students enrolled in a particular course are learning the content that faculty who teach the course agree that students should learn.” The course assessment process ensures that instructors are reviewing all course competencies, identifying competency levels, and assessing higher-order thinking.  

 

Program Assessment – Student Learning Outcomes

Every year, each technology program assesses how well students have mastered the essential program competencies.  Program assessment starts with a determination of a set of core competencies for the program.  The College’s preferred method of program development and revision is a modified DACUM (Developing/ Defining a Curriculum), called Occupational Task Analysis (OTA).  The OTA process utilizes a group of local practitioners (a focus group of persons who work in this occupation) to help the faculty determine a core group of competencies required for entry-level jobs in the field.  Occasionally, the College will use a DACUM from another institution in place of a local OTA.  When this occurs, program faculty review the proposed competencies with their advisory committees for agreement that local business and industries have similar expectations for graduates’ skills and knowledge.

 

Once a program identifies competencies (student learning outcomes), the faculty determine what they are going to measure, where they are going to measure it (in a course, generally, but not always), how they are going to measure it (test questions, portfolio, checklist, demonstration, presentation, etc.), and what they will use as a standard of success.  Not every learning outcome is necessarily measured every year.  In general, within a three-year cycle, each program will have assessed the majority of the student learning outcomes for the program. Once the faculty assesses, reviews, and analyzes data, program faculty meet to determine what specific program changes they want to implement.  Sometimes, the recommended modifications are internal (for example, spending more time on a topic or reinforcing that topic in multiple courses); other times, the modification requires resources (purchasing new lab equipment, for example).  It is critical to the process that faculty assess their student learning outcomes and make modifications to the program as they seek to improve the quality of the teaching and learning.  Assessments of program learning outcomes are documented for all programs.

 

Program Assessment – Instructional Program Self-Study

Instructional Program Self-Study (IPS) is a systematic way of assessing the effectiveness of majors from the perspective of students, graduates, advisory committee members, employers, faculty, and administration.  The self study, which occurs every three years, is an integral part of the academic affairs Institutional Effectiveness process.  IPS provides a mechanism for continuous program improvement, determination of program capabilities, articulation of program mission and vision, allocation and utilization of resources, and assessment of program strengths and weaknesses:

 

A committee comprised of faculty, staff and industry representatives conducts a thorough program analysis using established criteria.  The final report documents the effectiveness of each program and determines whether or not the instructional quality of the program meets the institutional and accreditation standards.  Through implementation of recommendations, the IPS process demonstrates that assessment results will be used in continuous improvement of student learning.

 

IPS outcomes are documented in the following year’s AIP.  This becomes the annual tracking document for implementing IPS recommendations, the basis for planning improvement activities, and funding through the budget process.  The AIP for curriculum programs is used as an abbreviated annual assessment. [PRO IV-10.16]

 

Every academic program participates in the IPS process.  Programs accredited by external agencies whose external accreditation cycle coincides with the program’s IPS cycle use the external self-study in lieu of the IPS.  The process includes an occupational task analysis (previously described).

 

Administrative and Educational Support Services

Units of the College that provide non-credit courses (Continuing Education), services that support the academic programs, and administrative offices evaluate their effectiveness through the administrative and educational support unit effectiveness plan.  (For the purpose of this discussion, “support unit” is used to define non-credit, academic support, and administrative units.)  The plan requires that each support unit define its mission and determine effectiveness goals (generally three to five).  For each goal, the support unit defines two or three measures appropriate to the goal, determines how the support unit is going to measure each goal, and determines what standard the support unit hopes to attain.  At the end of the evaluation cycle (early spring), the support unit measures its progress against the standard the support unit has set and recommends a plan of action, a modification to the standard, or no action if the support unit met the standard.  The College views this effectiveness process as providing a source for self-monitoring and reporting whether the support unit is effectively accomplishing its principal tasks and thereby supporting the institutional mission. 

 

Upon evaluation and analysis of success in accomplishing its functions, the unit reports its accomplishments to supervisors (ultimately to a vice president) through the AIP process.  The AIP is the College vehicle for communicating activities, determining whether goals have been achieved, and assigning additional resources to enable or help a support unit achieve its goals.   The support unit’s vice president reviews the AIP’s prior to budget planning sessions (April-June) and determines a priority for additional personnel, equipment, facilities, and the like.  Ultimately, the President’s Council determines the overall institutional priorities for resource allocation.

 

Examples of IE in action (College-wide)

The following examples illustrate how faculty, support staff, and administration use the results of the Institutional Effectiveness process to consider trends and results and to take actions to improve:

►Purchase of additional assistive technology equipment for use by visually impaired and hearing impaired students

►Improvement of advising through the addition, first, of an advising center, and then by increasing the staffing of the advising center to accommodate more students

►Replacement of approximately 1/3 of all computers on campus each year for the past three years; purchasing new servers and installing better switches and routers

►Centralization of all Student Affairs offices (except Career Planning and Placement) into one building to improve services to students

►Addition of a daytime Pharmacy Technology program due to increasing community demand for the program

►Addition of Associate Degree Nursing program to help meet the overwhelming demand for nurses in this and nearby communities

►Expansion of the College bookstore to approximately double the space it previously occupied

►Expansion of classroom technology (funded by the College, Title III, and other grant sources) in less than five years from virtually nothing to

                        40 Internet classes serving 600+ students per semester,

                        60 web-supplemented classes serving 1,100+ students,

                        40 multimedia carts and six “smart” classrooms,

                        on-line registration capability, and

                        web pages for about 95 percent of curriculum programs.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.3.1

Documentation

On-Campus Location

PRO I-60.1

 

 

PRO IV-10.17

 

 

Course Assessment Overview

 

 

PRO IV-10.22

 

 

Program Assessment Documents Matrix

Academic Unit Reports*

Support Unit Reports*

 

 

PRO IV-10.16

 

 

Instructional Program Self-Study

 

 

 

PROGRAMS

 

3.4  Educational Programs Standards for All Educational Programs

(Includes all on-campus, off-campus, and distance learning programs)

 

3.4.1    The institution demonstrates that each educational program for which academic credit is awarded (a) is approved by the faculty and the administration, and (b) establishes and evaluates program and learning outcomes.

 

   Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  The faculty and administration approve each educational program for which academic credit is awarded.  The Academic Review Committee, consisting of both faculty and administrative members, reviews all proposals for new programs and new courses.  The Academic Review Committee also reviews proposals for the revision of existing programs, including the addition or deletion of courses, the changing of prerequisites, and/or any modifications to the program display.  The purpose of the Academic Review Committee is to ensure that all program revisions are sound; that no conflicts exist that could cause problems with admissions requirements, financial aid, etc.; and that all revisions are in the best interest of the College and students. Each degree program must meet area commission, state board, and Commission on Higher Education standards.

 

The College catalog contains program descriptions for every certificate, diploma, and degree program. Each program has an established set of learning outcomes. These outcomes are determined through, although not limited to, the advisory committee, the DACUM, or the accrediting agency.  Course competencies are published in each course syllabus and correspond with the learning outcomes for the program. The Office of Institutional Effectiveness collects and files outcomes assessment forms.

 

The College uses numerous methods to evaluate whether or not outcomes of each program/course are being met. See under Core Requirement 3.3.1, Credit Educational Programs,

·        Course Assessment

·        Program Assessment—Student Learning Outcomes

·        Program Assessment—Institutional Program Self-Study

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.4.1

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog, pages 69-164

 

 

Program Assessment Documents Matrix (Academic Unit Report)

 

 

Learning Outcomes by Programs

 

 

 

3.4.2    The institution=s continuing education, outreach, and service programs are consistent with the institution=s mission.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  The mission of the Division of Continuing Education of Spartanburg Community College is to offer non-credit training to adult citizens of Cherokee, Spartanburg, and Union counties in South Carolina to advance and support the economic development of the area. The training meets a variety of customer needs:

·        Occupational Advancement

·        Customized Training for Business and Industry

·        New Employment and Dislocated Worker Training

·        Certification Review

·        Personal Development and Enrichment

·        Assessment and High Stakes Certification Testing

 

The Division’s mission is consistent with the institution’s mission, especially in the area of economic development. STC’s mission states, “The College advances economic development of the region through programs that address emerging and continuing employment needs…and assists students in achieving their professional and personal goals.”  The Division maintains high standards and focuses on student learning consistent with the institution’s mission to serve the upstate counties of Spartanburg, Union, and Cherokee.

 

The College participates in an outreach/service program by operating a Community Technology Center, one of a number of such centers throughout the nation funded by the US Department of Education. The center will operate through December of 2004, and the College will seek other funding sources to continue the program thereafter.

 

The name of the center is the Spartanburg Network headquartered at the Southside Learning Center, which houses a number of School District 7 special programs as well. The Network is a collaboration among STC, two school districts (Spartanburg District 3 and Spartanburg District 7), the Spartanburg County Library, the Adult Learning Center, Mount Moriah Baptist Church, the One-Stop Center, The Bethlehem Center, Spartanburg County Adult Education, Piedmont Community Actions, Inc., and the Spartanburg Housing Authority.

 

The Center’s mission is to demonstrate the educational effectiveness of technology and to expand access to information technology services and programs in the Southside neighborhood of Spartanburg.  The Community Technology Center’s mission is consistent with the institution’s mission. The center offers free technology classes and programs year round for children and adults, stressing computer skills, basic education, job readiness training, and web-based tutorial programs. Special programs conducted by the two school districts focus on students who are in danger of dropping out or falling behind in their classes.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.4.2

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog,

page 5

page 7

page 10

 

 

Community Technology Center

 

 

 

3.4.3    The institution publishes admissions policies consistent with its mission.   

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College publishes admission policies for students in its College catalog that are consistent with its mission, specifically to provide “accessible, affordable, equitable, state-of-the-art, postsecondary education” to citizens in its three-county service area.  To “advance the economic development of the region,” STC produces competent technicians. 

 

Spartanburg Community College is an affordable open enrollment college that offers over 70 credit programs of study.  The College offers a Dual Enrollment program and an Early Admission program for eligible high school students.  The College also provides students with an opportunity to enroll in the University Transfer program and earn transfer credit that is equivalent to courses taken during the freshman and sophomore years at a four-year college or university.  Additional offerings include a host of non-credit continuing education courses.  These courses provide training to enhance professional and personal growth within business, industry, and the community at large.

 

STC’s admission requirements support the College mission statement to serve a significant number of students within the “upstate counties of Spartanburg, Union, and Cherokee in South Carolina.”  Applicants under 18 must have earned a high school diploma or the equivalent.  STC recognizes the General Educational Development (GED) as an approved equivalent to the high school diploma.  Applicants who do not meet these requirements but wish to enroll in curriculum courses may request special admission to the vice president of student services.  For students admitted with identified academic skills deficiencies, remedial or transitional courses may be required.

 

Special Admissions Procedures include the following:

Admission of Special Applicants Program (ASAP):  Persons over 18-years of age may enroll on a “space available basis.”  ASAP applicants may exempt the ASSET or COMPASS assessment if taking technology courses.  However, ASAP applicants who enroll in transfer courses must take the appropriate section of ASSET or COMPASS, unless exempted.  Applicants who enroll in a course that has a prerequisite must verify that the prerequisites have been met.  ASAP students are not eligible for financial aid.

 

Early Admission: Eligible high school students are provided an opportunity to begin their postsecondary education prior to graduating high school.  Credits earned as an early admission student may be applied toward the appropriate STC program following graduation from high school provided the “credits are parallel to program requirements” and the department head provides approval.  Early admissions programs include the Dual Enrollment program and the Attend College Early program.  The Dual Enrollment program provides eligible junior and senior high school students an opportunity to enroll in Spartanburg Community College courses prior to graduating high school.  Courses include general education and technical areas and may be applied toward many STC programs of study.  Dual Enrollment courses are offered at participating high schools and/or career centers.  STC adheres to state and local policies regarding Dual Enrollment.  The high school and/or career center instructors who participate in Dual Enrollment must possess the same credentials as STC faculty who teach the equivalent course(s) on campus.  Also, participating high schools and/or career centers must use STC course syllabi, assessments/exams, and textbooks to ensure consistency of content being taught at the off-campus site.  In addition, STC faculty work closely with the high school and/or career center faculty, visit participating high schools and/or career centers, and evaluate progress.  The student receives dual credit on his or her STC transcript and high school transcript.  Also, the course grade is calculated on both STC and high school transcripts.  Successfully completed dual enrollment courses are transferable to the 16 technical colleges within the South Carolina Technical College System.

 

The Attend College Early (ACE) program is designed for high school seniors whose educational goal is to pursue a four-year degree. The student may enroll in freshman level courses on the STC campus. The courses offered in the ACE program are college transfer courses that are part of the existing two-year transfer program.  The courses are part of the statewide articulation agreement and are transferable to other state colleges.

 

High school students who desire early admission in the ACE or Dual Enrollment programs must do the following:

1.      Submit written permission from the high school principal and parent or guardian.

2.      Submit an admissions application.

3.      Complete the appropriate section(s) of the ASSET or COMPASS assessment or submit SAT or ACT scores.

 

Technical Advanced Placement:  In addition to early admission in the ACE and Dual Enrollment programs, the College offers Technical Advanced Placement (TAP) credit to qualified students.  Participating students must complete an assessment to determine skills and knowledge in a specific course area.  The student must master 80 percent of the course content to receive exemption credit.  TAP credit that is awarded is only creditable if the student attends STC.  The student is awarded credit hours, but a letter grade is not calculated in the GPA.

 

Foreign Students:  Foreign students must complete the admissions process three months prior to enrollment.  Foreign applicants must also submit the following:

1.      Medical Report

2.      Official English translation of secondary and postsecondary records and transcripts

3.      Score report from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL):  minimum score of 450 paper-based exam or 133 computer-based exam.

4.      Completed financial aid information form.

5.      Tuition deposit equivalent to cover tuition costs for two semesters.

 

The College provides admissions information through several methods. Pertinent admissions phone numbers are (864) 592-4800 or toll free 1-866-592-4700.

 

Continuing Education admissions policies may be found online and by calling (864) 592-4900 or 1-866-592-4900 (toll free).  Additional admissions information for Distance Learning courses may also be found online.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.4.3

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog

Page 5

Page 7

Page 14-18

Pages 25-27

Pages 63-65

 

 

Spartanburg Community College Orientation Resources Guide for Students 2004-2005

Page 8

Pages 13-14 

 

Admissions Office

Continuing Education Spring 2005 Schedule of Courses 

 

 

Spartanburg Community College Advance Placement (TAP) brochure 

 

Admissions Office

Spartanburg Community College Dual Enrollment Program brochure 

 

Admissions Office

Continuing Education

 

 

Distance Learning

 

 

  

3.4.4    The institution has a defined and published policy for evaluating, awarding, and accepting credit for transfer, experiential learning, advanced placement, and professional certificates that is consistent with its mission and ensures that course work and learning outcomes are at the collegiate level and comparable to the institution=s own degree programs.  The institution assumes responsibility for the academic quality of any course work or credit recorded on the institution=s transcript.     

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College’s policy for accepting and awarding credit for transfer, experiential learning, and advanced placement is consistent with its mission to assist students in achieving their professional and personal goals and to provide students with pre-baccalaureate programs and courses which transfer to senior colleges and universities.  The College publishes its exemption policy in the catalog, the student planner/handbook, and online.

 

The College requires that students complete at least 25 percent of their core courses through instruction offered by the College in order to receive a certificate, diploma, or degree from Spartanburg Community College. The College acknowledges the American Council on Education College Credit Recommendation Service. To receive exemption credit, the student must present documentation of course completion through an American Council on Education approved agency before the College will evaluate the course work.

 

The Dean of Enrollment Management evaluates transfer credit from other institutions but may seek input from the appropriate dean or department head. The Vice President of Academic Affairs has final approval on the applicability of transfer credit to a specific program of study.

 

The College awards exemption credit for Advanced Placement Examination scores of 3 or higher.

 

The program department head validates student competencies designated in articulation agreements between the College and secondary schools and determines exemption credit for experiential learning. The teaching faculty in the subject area for which credit is sought determines the appropriate method of evaluation. For example, a Civil Engineering student received exemption credit for an entry level drafting course after the Engineering Technology Department Head/Drafting Instructor verified that the student placed third in a national drafting contest. CPT 285 and CPT 209 exemption credit is given for experiential learning if a student has A+ Certification because these courses teach to the A+ Certification.   

 

Spartanburg Community College has transfer agreements with public and private colleges. The College follows the Statewide Articulation Agreement of 86 courses approved by the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education (CHE) for transfer from two- to four-year public institutions. By following the published exemption policy and defined articulation agreements, Spartanburg Community College ensures that the coursework and learning outcomes are at the collegiate level and assumes responsibility for the academic quality involved.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.4.4

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog,Pages 15-16, Exemption Policy

 

 

Exemption PolicyTransfer Guide

 

 

List of Articulation Agreements

 

 

Articulation Agreements (originals) 

 

President’s Office

CHE Articulation Guidelines

 

 

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog, page 24, Statewide Articulation Agreements: 86 Technical College Courses Transferable to Public Institutions

 

 

3.4.5    The institution publishes academic policies that adhere to principles of good educational practice.  These are disseminated to students, faculty, and other interested parties through publications that accurately represent the programs and services of the institution.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  The institution publishes academic policies that adhere to principles of good educational practice.  These are disseminated to students, faculty, and other interested parties through publications that accurately represent the programs and services of the institution.

 

Spartanburg Community College publishes academic policies that adhere to principles of good educational practice.  The policies include information about Academic Advising, Academic Standards of Progress, and grounds for Academic Suspension and Re-admission. Also included are policies about the Add/Drop period, information about auditing a course, class attendance standards, course withdrawal policies, and information about course overloads, the grading system, the Dean’s List, and graduation requirements.  This information is accessible to students, faculty, staff, and other interested parties through the College catalog, the student handbook, and corresponding sections of the College website.

 

Additional information about academic policies is available in each course on the course syllabus.  Each course syllabus includes a section that discusses grading procedures, attendance policies, and other information specific to that course.

 

The President’s Council ensures the Policies and Procedures Manual contains appropriate and updated information relating to all operations of the College.  The Human Resources Office houses the master copy.   Copies of this manual for reference are available online for faculty and staff in public folders and in the following STC offices for faculty and staff:

 

President

Executive Vice President

Vice President of Academic Affairs of Academic Affairs

Vice President of Planning and Development

Vice President  of Continuing Education

Library

Academic Divisions

Evening Services

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.4.5

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog, pages 56-60

 

 

Spartanburg Community College Student Planner & Handbook 2004-2005, pages 63-65, 69, 76, 85, 88-94

 

 

College Website

 

 

Policies and Procedures Manual 

 

Human Resources Office

Course Syllabus Template

 

 

3.4.6    The institution employs sound and acceptable practices for determining the amount and level of credit awarded for courses, regardless of format or mode of delivery.   

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College follows the policy and procedure established by the South Carolina Technical College System (SCTCS) for determining credit awarded for courses.  SCTCS Policy 3-1-103 and Procedure 3-1-103.1 outline the amount and level of course credits awarded.  The master Catalog of Approved Courses (CAC) specifies course prefix, number, description, and credit.  Courses with the same prefix and number have common competencies and objectives irrespective of the delivery method [lecture, video, telecourse, online, or hybrid (Half of the contact hours are lecture and half are online]. 

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.4.6

Documentation

On-Campus Location

3-1-103 Course Levels

 

 

3-1-103.1 Course Levels

 

 

Catalog of Approved Courses

 

 

3.4.7    The institution ensures the quality of educational programs/courses offered through consortia relationships or contractual agreements, ensures ongoing compliance with the comprehensive requirements, and evaluates the consortial relationship and/or agreement against the purpose of the institution.  

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Dual Enrollment, the state initiated Preparation for the Technologies (Tech Prep) program, and TechOnline are the consortia relationships or contractual agreements associated with Spartanburg Community College. These programs ensure the quality of the educational programs/ courses offered by developing manuals, policies, and/or procedures.

 

Dual Enrollment

Spartanburg Community College’s Procedure IV- 80.1, Dual Enrollment, states that the procedures “ensure that Spartanburg Community College in cooperation with Spartanburg, Cherokee, and Union county school districts and/or private secondary institutions will have high quality college-level courses for high-performing students and will embrace the mission and reflect the integrity of the Technical College System.”

 

Technical Advancement Placement (TAP)

The Upstate Tech Prep Consortium Manual addresses the purpose, mission, and direction of the Tech Prep Program:

 

Tech Prep involves specific high school and two-year college courses which provide the background and training for rewarding careers in technologies-careers in engineering, industrial, business, health, and public service fields.

 

Technical Advancement Placement (TAP) is a special part of the Tech Prep articulation program which enables qualified students to earn STC credit while in high school…[TAP is designed to] help students make a smooth transition from one level to another without experiencing delays, duplication of courses, or loss of credit.  Articulation reduces unnecessary duplication of educational programs/courses between high schools and college programs and enables students who do well in high schools to save time and money and to possibly complete degree or certificate programs earlier than normal at STC.  In the up-state area, the school districts in Spartanburg, Union, and Cherokee counties are linked with STC to accomplish this transition.  Under the process, beginning students at STC may not have to take entry-level courses in which content is equivalent to courses taken in high school.

 

TechOnline

TechOnline serves as a convenient forum for students to complete courses/programs while following the same quality of instructional credentials. All courses are academically equivalent to traditional classes taught on campus, and since students are learning in non-traditional modes, require a strong commitment by the student.

 

The College ensures ongoing compliance and the evaluation of the agreements (Technical Advanced Placement, Dual Enrollment, and TechOnline) against the purpose of the institution:

 

  1. According to the Upstate Tech Prep Consortium Manual, The “consortium faculty routinely review and revise the program (TAP) content.”  Included in the manual is a timeline of when such events take place.  Between mid-January and February, Spartanburg Community College faculty discuss and up-date articulation agreements and meet with consortium faculty.  By early March, revisions of Program Competencies for TAP are due.  Late March is the deadline for signing articulation agreements (after any adjustments to meet criteria/competencies).  The revision process for the state initiated Tech Prep occurs on an annual basis.
  2.  According to Spartanburg Community College’s Procedure IV-80.1

The appropriate STC full-time faculty and Chief Academic Officer or his/her designee shall assure that any faculty member teaching in dual enrollment offerings meets all relevant SACS criteria…The Academic Affairs Division of the South Carolina Technical College System will develop an annual report to be completed by each technical college offering dual enrollment courses to demonstrate compliance with the Dual Enrollment procedures for each course offered to high school students. 

 

The Division Dean signs a Dual Enrollment Faculty Credentials Verification Form to verify that the instructor(s) teaching Dual Enrollment course(s) meet the minimum credentials required by SACS.

 

  1. TechOnline courses provide access for all South Carolina technical colleges, and faculty teaching these courses hold the same academic credentials as faculty teaching in traditional courses.  The courses/programs follow the same quality of instructional credentials as traditional courses.
  2. The consortia agreement is housed in the President’s Office.  An operations manual is housed in the SC TechOnline Liaison’s Office.  The operations manual specifies continuing compliance to all SACS requirements, including faculty credentials.  Chief Academic Officers throughout the consortium monitor the quality of the online courses.  Student course evaluations reside at the host institution.
  3. A Roster of Instructional Staff is available in the Academic Affairs Office.  This roster is a list of faculty who are credentialed to teach Dual Enrollment courses, TAP courses, and TechOnline courses. Academic Affairs updates the roster annually.

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.4.7

Documentation

On-Campus Location

PRO IV-80.1, Dual Enrollment

 

 

Upstate Tech Prep Consortium Manual

 

 

Dual Enrollment Faculty Credentials Verification form 

 

Academic Affairs Office

Tech On-Line Operations Manual, February 2003  

 

SC TechOnline Liaison Office

Roster of Instructional Staff 

 

Academic Affairs Office

3.4.8    The institution awards academic credit for course work taken on a noncredit basis only when there is documentation that the noncredit course work is equivalent to a designated credit experience.   

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College (STC) does not award credit for course work taken on a noncredit basis except in the case of credit by examination or experiential credit for currently enrolled students who meet specific requirements as described in STC Procedures IV-20.1 and V-40.3. An example of such exceptional credit is Management with Fire Services Electives. See also additional discussion in the Admissions Procedures section of the College catalog and in the Continuing Education Course Schedule.  Courses offered for continuing education credit are not concurrently offered for academic credit.  Transfer credit is awarded only for students who have earned equivalent academic credit for approved course work taken at another postsecondary institution. 

In the case of credit by examination (Procedure V-40.3), credit may be granted for previous academic work or relevant work experience. The evidence must include the result of an appropriate examination, written report or demonstration. The appropriate department head must coordinate credit by examination, and credit is dependent on the availability of acceptable documentation.  Students may not attempt credit by examination for courses in which they have been previously enrolled (either for credit or audit) or for which they have previously attempted credit by examination.

 

Experiential credit (Procedure IV-20.1) may be awarded for knowledge acquired through work or other experiences external to academics. Students will be required to provide a portfolio or other documentation of acquired knowledge. The teaching faculty in the subject area in which credit is sought will determine the appropriate method of evaluation and the time frame for completion. The department head approves the credit awarded through experiential learning. 

 

For example, a department head, looking at course competences and comparing them to requirements for existing continuing education courses, awarded exemption credit for the following:

 

CPT 179 MICROCOMPUTER WORD PROCESSING exemption credit is awarded for completion of Continuing Education’s 28 hours in Word, Level 1, 2, & 3, and Word, Core MOUS Prep.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.4.8

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog, pages 15-17

 

 

Continuing Education Course Schedule

 

 

PRO IV-20.1

 

 

PRO V-40.3

 

 

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog Addendum, page5

 

 

3.4.9    The institution provides appropriate academic support services.   

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College (STC) provides students with strong academic support services.  Support services are available to every student the College serves.  The following academic support services are available to STC students:

 

Tutorial Learning Center

Open Computer Lab

Success Network

Library

Distance Learning

Testing Center

ASSET/COMPASS Placement Examinations

Transitional Studies

Advising Center

Academic Advising (Curriculum)

Disability Services

AIM Center

 

Students have access to the College’s Tutorial Learning Center (TLC), located in Room E-2 of the East Building.  The TLC provides tutorial services for students in the following areas:  English, mathematics, sciences, and accounting.  In general, the TLC utilizes professional tutors rather than peer tutors.  All STC students are eligible to use the TLC without extra charge and on a walk-in basis.  In addition, the TLC offers assistance to STC’s online students through e-mail or telephone calls.

 

An extension of the TLC, the Open Computer Lab provides students with a location to use computers for academic purposes. Lab assistants, who may or may not be STC students, are available whenever the lab is open.  These lab assistants help students with Internet research, printing of papers, use of specialized programs for some classes that have a computerized component, and logging in to WebCT for classes that are either online or contain an online component.

 

STC also offers Success Network, a TRIO program funded by the US Department of Education, as an alternative for students who desire tutorial services.  Success Network is designed differently from the TLC in that tutorial sessions are available by appointment rather than on a walk-in basis.  Students must apply and meet certain criteria to be a part of the Success Network program.  Located in the Dan L. Terhune Student Services Building, Success Network provides tutorial services, academic and personal counseling services, exposure to cultural events, and workshops in study skills and job seeking skills. 

 

The STC library, located in the Tracy J. Gaines Learning Resource Center, is a valuable part of the campus.  In addition to housing books, reference materials, and periodicals, the library has an extensive collection of online information sources for both on-campus students and distance-learning students to utilize.  The library also has a computer lab for students to use for research and other academic endeavors.  Within the next two years, the library will be moving into a new facility that will contain a new library and additional classroom space.  The building will be 43,000 square feet, with plans for future expansion. The library itself will be approximately 22,000 square feet.

 

STC Distance Learning provides students and faculty with quality alternative learning and teaching options using the latest technological delivery methods.  It provides technical support and other services for both on-campus and off-campus faculty and students who are teaching or taking any type of distance learning course, including compressed video, online, or traditional courses using WebCT.  Technical support via email, phone, or face-to-face is available during normal College hours:  Monday-Thursday, 7:30 am-8:30 pm; Friday, 7:30 am-1:00 pm.  Online students also have access to support from instructors and one another via WebCT, e-mail, and chat rooms.  Located in the Tracy Gaines Learning Resource Center, Distance Learning offers on-campus and electronic orientations and workshops for online students at the beginning of each semester as well as electronic support materials. 

 

STC has a Testing Center available for students and instructors to use for testing situations that fall outside the normal classroom testing times.  Additionally, the Testing Center provides a testing environment for students who are taking online or Distance Learning classes.  Tests taken in the Testing Center may be either paper format or computerized tests; the Testing Center houses ten computers for online testing.  Make-up testing and password-protected online tests are available.  Proctors, who are not current STC students, staff the center, located in E-3 in the East Building.  STC is a member of the Consortium of College Testing Centers, a free referral service that coordinates testing for Distance Learning students from other colleges.

 

Students take an assessment test prior to admission to the College.  Using the ASSET and/or COMPASS exam, the College determines proper placement for each student according to his or her academic skill level.  In some instances, students may exempt the assessment tool based on SAT scores, ACT scores, or prior academic experience.  The College uses this information in advising the student with his or her academic class schedule.  The College also provides students with individual advising sessions and the opportunity to attend workshops on topics such as time management or test taking strategies.

 

Transitional Studies is a branch of academics that provides courses designed to enhance the academic abilities of those students needing to refine their skills prior to entering curriculum coursework.  The courses provided are typically basic skills courses in grammar, writing, reading, and mathematics.  Some courses, such as Introductory Chemistry (CHM 100) and Introductory Biology (BIO 100), are “bridging” courses that assist students in meeting pre-entry requirements for programs having science prerequisites. 

 

Students who are enrolled in Transitional Studies courses gain the benefit of the College’s Advising Center, which is located in room E-1 of the East Building.  The Advising Center is a valuable resource for improving student retention and helping students learn how to function in a college environment.  The Advising Center assists transitional students with course planning, career goals, and information about support services and academic policies and procedures, to help them become successful and established college students.  The Advising Center is in the process of expanding its services to include first semester students who are not enrolled in Transitional Studies, assisting them also with College orientation and training in online registration.

 

The College assigns a curriculum academic advisor to students who do not report to the Advising Center for their advising sessions.  The academic advisor assists students with course planning and helps students ensure that they meet graduation requirements. 

 

Available to STC students with documented disabilities, Disability Services is located in the Dan Lee Terhune Student Services Building.  Disability Services also serves as an avenue for students with any documented disability to request needed accommodations in the academic environment.  The cooperative program with the South Carolina School for the Deaf and the Blind attracts visually and hearing impaired students to the campus.  The cooperative program also hosts an assistive technology lab for disabled students to use in their academic work.  The assistive technology lab has a variety of tools that are beneficial to visually and hearing impaired students. 

 

The AIM Center assists students in the following categories: single parents, displaced homemakers, single pregnant women, individuals with disabilities, individuals from economically disadvantaged families, students with limited English proficiency, and men and women in non-traditional majors.  The center hires teachers and educators to tutor in the evening for those students unable to meet when Success Network offers tutoring.  Currently, the AIM Center provides tutoring in English, math, and science.

 

The College surveyed a sample of students using the ACT Student Opinion Survey in March 2004.  The survey results provided the following information concerning student satisfaction with services on campus:

 

Of the 32.1% who used tutorial services, 82.8% were satisfied.  Of the 71.4% who used the library’s facility and services, 87.7% were satisfied. Of the 66.3% who used academic advising services, 78.3% were satisfied.  These percentages of satisfaction are all above the national norm.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.4.9

Documentation

 On-Campus Location

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog

       Tutorial Learning Center:  Page 35
       Success Network:  Page 35
       Library:  Pages 32-33
       STC Distance Education Website
       Testing Center:  Page 35
       ASSET/COMPASS:  Pages 17-18
       Transitional Studies:  Pages 59-60
       Advising Center:  Page 30
       Curriculum Advising:  Page 56
       Disability Services:  Page 34
       AIM Center:  Page 30

 

 

ACT Student Opinion Survey Results, March 2004

 

 

Counselor/Advisor Guides (Course Placement Recommendations)
(Revised October 2004)

ASSET Criterion Scores

Parallel Compass Scores

 

 

Student Support Services through the US Department of Education

 

 

Tutorial Learning Center Brochure 

 

Tutorial Learning Center

Open Computer Lab Brochure 

 

Open Computer Lab

3.4.10  The institution defines and publishes general education requirements for its undergraduate programs and major program requirements for all its programs. These requirements conform to commonly accepted standards and practices for degree programs.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  The Spartanburg Community College catalog outlines every degree program with required courses listed, including general education requirements, major requirements, and any elective requirements.  Associate programs require at least 15 semester credit hours of general education coursework.  Diploma programs require at least 9 semester credit hours of general education coursework.  Some certificate programs may have general education requirements.  These requirements are based on State Curriculum Models.

 

Spartanburg Community College only offers courses outlined in the state CAC (Catalog of Approved Courses) and State Curriculum Models (Statewide Articulation Agreements.)  These courses and models conform to the state’s requirements approved by the South Carolina Technical College System and were developed to comply with SACS requirements.  The College must submit any proposed changes for state-level approval before implementation.  Approval at the state level indicates that courses conform to commonly accepted standards used by other institutions in the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.  Both distance learning courses and traditional lecture courses adhere to the same competencies and standards.  For example, an English Composition course delivered through distance learning has the same competencies and standards as the same English Composition course delivered in a lecture format (Statewide Articulation Agreements.) 

 

The requirements for Spartanburg Community College’s programs conform to commonly accepted standards.  This conformity is further demonstrated by the accreditations granted to the institution which include the following as outlined in the 2004-2005 College catalog.

 

The College offers programs accredited by the following:

 

• Association of Collegiate Business Schools and Programs (ACBSP)

 

• Civil Engineering Technology, Electronics Engineering Technology and Mechanical Engineering Technology are accredited by the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21202-4012, telephone: (410) 347-7700

 

• Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (Medical Assisting, Respiratory Care and Surgical Technology Programs)

 

• Commission on Dental Accreditation, American Dental Association

 

• National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences, P.O. Box 75634, Chicago, Illinois 60675-5634, Phone (773) 714-8880, Website- www.naacls.org

 

• National Automotive Technicians Education Foundation - Automotive Service Excellence

 

• National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission

 

• South Carolina Department of Nursing Board - Labor, Licensing and Regulation

 

• Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology, 20 North Wacker Drive, Suite 900, Chicago, IL 60606-2901, (312) 704-5300, e-mail: mail@jrcert.org

 

Accreditation granted after publication of 2004-2005 catalog:

American Culinary Federation, 2004.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.4.10

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog, pages 61-164

 

 

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog, “Statewide Articulation Agreements

 

 

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog “Accreditations”

 

 

Catalog of Approved Courses

 

 

3.4.11  The institution protects the security, confidentiality, and integrity of its student academic records and maintains special security measures to protect and back up data.  

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  The security, confidentiality, and integrity of student academic records are protected by the College’s adherence to the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act and by College policy.  As stated in the STC catalog,

 

STC maintains accurate and confidential student records and recognizes the right of students to gain access to their academic records in accordance with the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974 (Buckley Amendment) and College policy.  Amendments to FERPA under section 507 of the U.S. Patriot Act of 2001 also apply to the release of student records. 

 

Students are made aware of their rights and the College’s policies governing those rights through a number of sources.  The STC catalog contains a section entitled Release of Student Information.  The STC website includes a page titled Notification of Student’s Rights under FERPA.  The STC student handbook also addresses this issue under Release of Student Information.

Faculty and staff are informed of their responsibilities concerning academic records in Procedure V – 50.4 Management and Release of Student Records.  Faculty and Staff Development activities and new faculty/staff orientations also provide training concerning this critical issue.  For example, on November 24, 2003, STC’s Director of Information Technologies presented a training session entitled Legal Issues Regarding Students (FERPA) and the Privacy Act.

 

Procedure IV-10.3 states the responsibilities of faculty members regarding the retention and destruction of final examinations and grade books.  Full-time faculty are required to retain final examinations and grade books in a secure location for at least one year after final grades are submitted to the Records Office.  Department Heads are responsible for the security and retention of adjunct faculty’s final examinations and grade books.  The same retention time frame applies.  As stated in Procedure IV – 10.3, “The Records Office is responsible for the final destruction of hard copy final examinations and hard copy grade books.”

Special security measures are in place to protect and back up data.  Information Technologies (IT) store student records on a secured server attached to a fault-tolerant Storage Area Network (SAN).  IT also backs up the server to a high speed Digital Linear Tape (DLT) drive system every night and stores backup tapes in a fireproof safe when not in use.  Although these security measures are standard operating procedure for the Information Technologies department, the compliance certification team discovered STC had no written procedure.  The team recommended writing such a procedure.  The procedure will be approved before May 2005.

STC also has an Information Security Plan that can be accessed by faculty and staff via Public Folders.  This plan’s objectives are “to ensure the security and confidentiality of customer information, to protect against any anticipated threats to the security or integrity of such information, and to guard against the unauthorized access to, or use of, such information that could result in substantial harm or inconvenience to any customer.”

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.4.11

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog, Release of Student Information

 

 

Notification of Student’s Rights under FERPA

 

 

Spartanburg Technical Student Planner & Handbook 2004-2005, pages 83-84, Release of Student Information

 

 

PRO V-50.4 Management of Student Records

 

 

PRO IV-10.3

 

 

Information Security Plan

 

 

Privacy Presentation

 

 

3.4.12  The institution places primary responsibility for the content, quality, and effectiveness of its curriculum with its faculty.   

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  STC’s faculty is primarily responsible for the development and the content of the College’s curriculum.  As stated on the Faculty Performance Management System document, the number one job duty of faculty is “Instructional Development.”  This includes “the development, revision, and maintenance of courses and curriculum through course objectives, outlines, and appropriate instructional materials.”

As stated in Procedure IV – 10.18, “Faculty develops and revises curriculum courses using a standard course format.”  This format includes a standard course syllabus and addendum.  “Faculty identifies course competencies and objectives through the Occupational Task Analysis process, professional task lists/matrices, Advisory Committees, and feedback from articulation groups.”

Faculty also controls course assessment.  Annually, department heads and instructors assess the particular courses they are responsible for teaching.  Full-time instructors, as well as adjunct instructors, participate in this yearly appraisal of the courses that they teach.  Faculty uses the information gathered in this assessment to ensure that the competencies stated in the syllabus are effectively presented and that students leave the course with the knowledge and skills they need for success in their subsequent courses or on the job. [Procedure IV – 10.17]

Student evaluation of instruction further addresses the quality and effectiveness of STC’s curriculum.  As stated in Procedure IV – 10.14, “Students will have the opportunity to evaluate anonymously the instructional process on a regular basis.  Evaluations will be used to improve instruction, instructional materials, and instructional settings.”  This evaluation process is also in the purview of faculty.  The dean, department head, and faculty member all share the results of the evaluations.     

 

Faculty and department heads use student evaluations to take direct action.  For example, the English Department recently used the preponderance of negative comments on student evaluations as a catalyst for the decision to change texts for that course.  Also, as an additional example, the Science Department purchased human models for their anatomy and physiology courses as a result of student comments.

Supervisors also observe faculty members to ensure the quality and effectiveness of their teaching methodology.  The faculty member’s department head, who is also a faculty member, conducts this observation.  Procedure IV – 10.13 states how often these supervisor observations occur.

As evidenced by Procedure IV – 10.16, department heads and other faculty members assess each program on a three-year cycle through the Instructional Program Self-Study.

The department head discusses any needed changes with the division dean. If the changes are major in scope and affect other areas of the College, the academic dean or department head proposes the changes to the Academic Review Committee.  The Academic Review Committee is a group appointed by the Vice President of Academic Affairs to review such changes. The Academic Review Committee discusses the pros and cons of the proposed changes.  After deliberation, the committee either approves the changes or sends recommendations back to the department for further consideration.      

 

Academic Review Committee Membership

  • Vice President of Academic Affairs
  • Vice President of Student Affairs
  • Vice President of Planning and Development
  • Dean of Arts and Sciences (faculty)
  • Dean of Business, Industrial and Engineering Technologies (faculty)
  • Dean of Health and Human Services (faculty)
  • Dean of Enrollment Management
  • Dean of Learning Resources
  • Director of the Advising Center
  • Director of Student Financial Aid
  • Department Head of Transitional Studies (faculty)

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.4.12

Documentation

On-Campus Location

FPMS Form

 

 

PRO IV-10.18 Curriculum Course Development and Revisions

 

 

PRO IV-10.22 Occupational Task Analysis

 

 

PRO IV-10.17  Course Assessment of Credit Courses

 

 

PRO IV-10.14  Student Evaluation of Instruction

 

 

PRO IV-10.13  Faculty Classroom Observation by Supervisor

 

 

PRO IV-10.16  Instructional Program Self-Study

 

 

Academic Review Committee Minutes

 

 

3.4.13  For each major in a degree program, the institution assigns responsibility for program coordination, as well as for curriculum development and review, to persons academically qualified in the field.  In those degree programs for which the institution does not identify a major, this requirement applies to a curricular area or concentration.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College assigns responsibility for developing course(s) to academically qualified faculty, with department heads and deans making final approvals.  The following chart identifies the individuals responsible for program coordination and curriculum development. Additional credentialing information may be obtained from the Roster of Instructional Staff.

 

Major Area/Degree

Responsible

Credentials

Dean

Coordinator

Arts and Sciences

Associate in Arts

 

Associate in Science

 

Horticulture Technology
  Associate Degree in Agriculture Technology

Steven Faulkner

 

Steven Faulkner

 

 

 

James Painter

 

B.S., Industrial Engineering, Clemson University

M.Ed., Sec. Ed. - Mathematics, Converse College

 

 

B.S., Agriculture Education, Clemson

University; M.S., Horticulture, Clemson University

 

Health and Human Services

 

 

 

Early Childhood Development
  Associate Degree in Occupational Technology
    Advance Childcare Management Specialty

Early Childhood Development
  Associate Degree in Occupational Technology
    Special Needs Specialty

Early Childhood Development
  Associate Degree in Occupational Technology
    Infant Toddler Specialty

 

Medical Laboratory Technology
  Associate Degree

 

 

 

 

Medical Assisting
  Associate Degree in Occupational Technology

 

 

Surgical Technology
  Associate Degree in Occupational Technology

 

 

 

 

 

Nursing
  Associate Degree

 

Radiography
  Associate Degree

 

 

Respiratory Care
  Associate Degree

Dr. Rita Melton

 

 

 

 

Patricia Voelker

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ellen Romani

 

 

 

 

 

Donna Buchanan

 

 

 

Emily Rogers

 

 

 

 

 

 

Susan Casey

 

 

Deborah Jennings

 

 

 

Randall Anderson

B.A., Biology, Coker College

B.S.N., University of South Carolina

D.M.D., Medical University of South Carolina

 

B.S., Recreation and Psychology, North Carolina State University;

M.Ed., Early Childhood Education, University of South Carolina

 

 

 

 

 

 

A.A.S., Medical Laboratory Technology, Spartanburg Community College

B.S., Interdisciplinary Studies, University of South Carolina

M.S., Health Services Administration, Medical University of  South Carolina

 

A.A.S., Applied Science, Western Piedmont Community College

B.H.S., Medical University of South Carolina

 

 

R.N.; A.S.T.N., University of South Carolina - Spartanburg; B.S.,

Management of Human Resources, Southern Wesleyan University; Certified Surgical Technologist;

Certified Operating Room Nurse

 

 

B.S.N., University of North Carolina

M.N. Nursing Administration, University of South Carolina

 

R.T.(R)(M)(QM)(ARRT)

B.S., Radiologic Technology, Medical University of South Carolina

 

R.R.T., A.A.S., Respiratory Therapy, Greenville Technical College

 

Business

 

 

 

Accounting
  Associate Degree

Management
  Associate Degree

Management w/ Fire Service Electives
  Associate Degree

Management w/ Hotel, Restaurant
  and Travel Electives
    Associate Degree

Management w/ Information Technology Electives
  Associate Degree

Management w/ Marketing Electives
  Associate Degree

Management  w/ Culinary Arts Electives

  Associate Degree

 

Office Systems Technology
  Associate Degree 

Office Systems Technology – Medical Option
  Associate Degree

 

Computer Technology
  Associate Degree

Computer Technology w/ Networking Electives
  Associate Degree in Computer Technology

Computer Technology w/ Web Page
  Development Electives
    Associate Degree in Computer Technology

Lynn Dale

 

 

 

 

Daryl Smith

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Karen Ravan

 

 

 

 

Marcia Schenck

 

A.A.S., Accounting, Spartanburg Community College

B.G.S., University of South Carolina

M.B.A., Clemson University

 

B.A., Political Science, University of South Carolina,

Spartanburg

M.B.A., Clemson University

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A.A.S., Computer Programming, Spartanburg Community College

B.S.N., M.B.A., Clemson University

 

 

B.S., Applied Science, Miami University of Ohio

M.B.A., Clemson University

Cisco Certified Network Associate

Engineering Technology

 

 

 

Civil Engineering Technology
  Associate Degree

 

Electronics Engineering Technology
  w/ Computer Applications
    Associate Degree

Electronics Engineering Technology
  w/ Industrial Applications
    Associate Degree

 

Engineering Graphics Technology
  w/ Architectural Computer Aided Drafting
    Associate Degree

Engineering Graphics Technology
  w/ Mechanical Computer Aided Drafting
    Associate Degree

General Engineering Technology
  Associate Degree

Mechanical Engineering Technology
  Associate Degree

Lynn Dale

 

 

 

 

Melissa Wilkins

 

 

Joseph Santaniello

 

 

 

 

 

 

John Watts

A.A.S., Accounting, Spartanburg Community College

B.G.S., University of South Carolina

M.B.A., Clemson University

 

B.S., Civil Engineering, Clemson University

M.S., Civil Engineering, Vanderbilt University

 

B.E.E., Manhattan College

M.S.E.E., Syracuse University

Certificate of Graduate Study, Higher Education Leadership, University of South Carolina

 

 

 

B.S., Mechanical Engineering, Clemson University

 

Industrial Technology

 

 

 

Automotive Technology FORD ASSET
  Associate Degree

Automotive Technology
  Automotive Service Technology
    Associate Degree

 

 

 

Industrial Electronics Technology
  Associate Degree

Industrial Electronics Technology
  Automated Manufacturing Technology Option
    Associate Degree

 

 

Machine Tool Technology
  Associate Degree

Lynn Dale

 

 

 

 

Jeff Hunt

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ronald Towery

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charles Shaw

A.A.S., Accounting, Spartanburg Community College

B.G.S., University of South Carolina

M.B.A., Clemson University

 

A.A.S., Industrial/Auto Technology, Tri-County Technical College

B.S., Industrial Education, Clemson University

Certificate of Graduate Study, Higher Education Leadership

M.Ed., Community and Occupational Program in Education, University of South Carolina

Experience: Industry, 8 Years; Teaching, 17 Years

 

A.A.S., Industrial Electronics, A.O.T.,Vocational Technical Education, Spartanburg Community College

B.S., Human Resources, Central Wesleyan College

Experience: Industry, 7 Years; Teaching, 18 Years

 

 

 

A.A.S., Tool and Die, Florence-Darlington Technical College

A.O.T., Vocational Technical Education, Spartanburg

Technical College

Experience: Industry, 4 Years; Teaching, 30 Years

 

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.4.13

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Roster of Instructional Staff

 

 

3.4.14  The institution=s use of technology enhances student learning, is appropriate for meeting the objectives of its programs, and ensures that students have access to and training in the use of technology.    

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College uses technology to enhance student learning in all programs offered. During spring semester of each year, the Annual Improvement Plan (AIP) process is completed and as part of this process, department heads evaluate the need for new equipment/technology. Department heads then identify these equipment/technology needs and put them into the budget process by including them in the department AIP. Each academic division makes a prioritized listing of these equipment/technology requests and submits the list to the Academic Affairs Office. When the President’s Council allocates funds to Academic Affairs for equipment/technology, the prioritized lists are used for purchases.

 

Enhancing Learning

Adding technology provides alternate means to deliver course content, allowing for more and better opportunities to learn.  For example,

  • At its most basic level, technology adds another medium (email) by which students can communicate with their instructors.
  • Online chat software allows instructors to offer online “office hours” so that students have better access when problems or questions arise.
  • Visual learners are afforded new and better access to information by the use of in-class slide presentations.
  • Geographically distant students are able to “attend” online classes when they otherwise could not.
  • Many new textbooks are available with software that provides review exercises, case studies, further reading, and much more.

 

Access to Technology

In addition to the Open Computer Lab, STC also provides computers in the open lab in the Health and Human Services Building and in the Tracy Gaines Learning Resource Center (LRC).  The Tutorial Learning Center contains computers and provides computer-assisted instruction as well as one-on-one and group tutorial sessions.

 

STC offers classes in numerous computer-equipped classrooms. Three rolling computer carts are in use, each containing 16 computers.  Providing 48 mobile computers, these carts allow any classroom to become an impromptu computer lab.  The LRC also provides laptops for student use in the Library.  In total, over 700 computers are available for student use.

 

Each classroom, lab, or study center also has hard-wired network/internet access, and many classrooms offer wireless network/internet access.  Network/internet access is available at all campus computer workstations.

 

In the classroom, instructors use technologies such as WebCT, CampusCruiser, smartboards, and PowerPoint presentations to facilitate learning.  Many classes also incorporate software specifically targeted toward course competencies.  The full list of classes incorporating some form of computer technology can be found in the documentation listed below.  Many of these courses are distance learning courses employing computer technology to deliver content.

 

Students are able to manage many aspects of their matriculation using WebAdvisor, and every student has an e-mail account in Campus Cruiser.

 

In classrooms and labs throughout the College, students are able to use the latest in technological equipment. Examples of this technology use are as follows:

 

Commercial Graphics Program uses a Heildelberg Quicksetter 300E computer-to-plate system. This system is advanced technology in the printing industry.

 

Industrial Electronics Program uses a Lab Volt Electromechanical Trainer. This trainer simulates electromechanical equipment used in local industries.

 

Civil Engineering Technology Program uses the Trimble 5600 Robotic Surveying Total Stations. These stations, coupled with the TDS Recon Pocket PC data collectors, allow one-person collection of position and elevation data in the field.

 

Training in the Use of Technology

The Open Computer Lab (OCL) and the Tutorial Learning Center are available for students who need assistance becoming familiar with new technology.  The OCL offers no-cost training sessions at intervals throughout the year; one-on-one assistance is available at no charge. 

 

Almost 95% of STC degree programs require basic computer literacy classes, with students being required to take “CPT 101 – Introduction to Computers” or other program-specific basic computer literacy courses.  At the time of this writing, first-time AA/AS students must take Advising Center Course ADVC 900, and those students taking remedial courses (031 & 032) must take Advising Center Course ACTS 800. These courses make up STC’s Advisement for Academic Independence Program, training students to utilize computers for the processes of self-registering, checking class grades, checking financial aid awards, and more. Over the next three years, all programs will adopt these same course requirements. 

                                               

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.4.14

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg Community College Student Planner & Handbook, page 80

 

 

Spartanburg Community College Student Planner & Handbook, page 93

 

 

STC Library Website

 

 

STC Distance Learning Website

 

 

STC Home Page

 

 

Courses Employing Technology

 

 

 

3.5  Educational Programs:  Undergraduate Programs

 

3.5.1    The institution identifies college-level competencies within the general education core and provides evidence that graduates have attained those competencies.

 

   Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College is committed to providing students the cross-curriculum knowledge and skills expected of an educated person and, therefore, requires a general education core in all degree programs.

 

The Spartanburg Community College catalog identifies the general education competencies on page 6 under “Student Outcomes.”

 

When students graduate from Spartanburg Community College, they must possess the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to successfully secure a job or pursue a career. At a level appropriate to his /her area of study, every graduate of an associate degree program at the college will

1.      Perform mathematical operations.

2.      Communicate effectively both orally and in writing.

3.      Comprehend written material.

4.      Work effectively within a group.

5.      Demonstrate problem-solving ability.

6.      Demonstrate proficiency in information literacy.

 

The state technical college system mandates conformity to state-established curriculum standards. For any program to receive state approval, that program must clearly contain the general education requirements listed in the state models for each degree.  Each state model contains a minimum of 15 semester hours of general education as per the example listed below:

 

DEGREE: Associate in Agriculture

MAJOR: Horticulture Technology

General Education             (Minimum)                15

Each associate degree program must contain a basic core of 15 semester hour credits in general education courses. The core must include at least one course from each of the following areas: humanities/fine arts, social/behavioral sciences, and natural sciences/mathematics.

 

Various program DACUMS (trademark name for developing a curriculum process) also echo these student outcomes. DACUM committee members identify specific outcomes on a chart, and faculty members integrate these skills into programs and courses. For example, the Management with Marketing Electives DACUM specifies skills related to “Exhibit Technical Skills,” which include applying appropriate math skills. The DACUM also specifies skills related to “Communicate Effectively,” which include effective listening skills, effective oral communication skills, and effective written communication skills.

 

Outside accrediting bodies, such as the Technology Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), mandate a general education core for these programs. These programs’ accreditation hinges, in part, on the identification and teaching of general education courses. At Spartanburg Community College, ABET accredits Civil Engineering Technology, Electronics Engineering Technology, and Mechanical Engineering Technology.

 

The College provides evidence of achievement of General Education competencies through performance-based outcomes/assessments in General Education courses and curriculum courses and through capstone courses.

 

Performance-Based Outcomes /Assessments

 

Spartanburg Community College has made a commitment to performance-based learning. Course syllabi state clear, measurable competencies students need to meet. Instructors design assessments of competencies to measure student attainment of those competencies.

 

The course syllabi for the typical general education core courses provide documentation for this standard. The following example is from ENG 101 English Composition I:

 

Writing Requirements: Students in ENG 101 are required to complete the following:

(a)   four essays, at least three of which must include parenthetical documentation and a Works Cited or Works Consulted page in MLA format

(b)   other writing assignments, which may include rough drafts of major papers, summaries, portfolios, a journal, etc., at the instructor’s discretion

(c)   an essay exam, composed during one class period the last week of classes or during the final exam period.

 

In ENG 101, essays submitted that contain the following will be considered unacceptable and will receive no grade:

1.      no thesis

2.      failure to support the thesis

3.      five different spelling errors (including apostrophe usage)

4.      more than two major sentence structure errors on a page

-          fragments

-          run-ons (fused or comma splices)

-          subject-verb agreement errors

-          faulty structures

5.      plagiarism, failure to cite sources within text and/or to include a correctly formatted (in MLA) works cited or works consulted page

 

Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to:

 

I.                     Analyze content and rhetorical structure in essay models

1.      read assigned selections

2.      participate in discussions that analyze selections

3.      respond to selections through written assignments

 

II.                   Support a thesis with well-organized, relevant evidence

1.      clearly formulate a thesis sentence that defines the purpose of   the paper

2.      include as thesis support primary source quotes in written assignments

3.      develop the paper using an introduction, body, and conclusion

 

III.                  Synthesize researched materials in a coherent essay focused on a clear thesis

1.      conduct research of secondary sources using a variety of media

2.      discriminate between valid sources and invalid sources

3.      integrate quotes and supporting evidence into the body of the research paper

4.      use transitional expressions and patterns to achieve coherence in writing

 

IV.               Document source materials using Modern Language Association (MLA) guidelines

1.      use MLA guidelines to format in-text citations correctly where documentation is needed

2.      use MLA guidelines to format a works cited and/or consulted page (list of references)

3.      follow all MLA formatting guidelines

 

V.                 Compose essays free of major grammatical, mechanical, spelling, and punctuation errors

1.      review rules of usage, mechanics, and grammar when needed

2.      use dictionary to proof for spelling errors

3.      proofread and revise all drafts before producing a final draft.

 

 

Examples of evidence of achievement of College competencies for ENG 101 are as follows:

 

            College Level Outcome: Communicate Effectively in Writing

 

1.      What is measured? Ability to compose essays free of major grammatical, mechanical, spelling, and punctuation errors

      Where is it measured? ENG 101 English Composition I

      How measured? Rubric

      What is acceptable standard? 85% of students will compose

      essays with fewer than two major grammatical errors on a page

      and fewer than five misspelled words; they will compose essays

      with fewer than five mechanical and punctuation errors

      What is the actual performance? 91% of 2002/03 students

      completed successfully.

 

2.      What is measured? Ability to support a thesis with relevant evidence

      Where is it measured? ENG 101 English Composition I

      How is it measured? Rubric

      What is acceptable standard? 85% of students will incorporate

      primary and secondary source material that supports and

      illustrates their main point in an essay composition

      What is actual performance? 93% of 2002/03 students

      completed successfully. 

 

College Level Outcome: Comprehend Written Material

 

What is measured? Ability to analyze content and rhetorical structure in essay models

Where is it measured? ENG 101 English Composition I

How is it measured? Quizzes; journal entries; formal essays

What is acceptable standard? 85% of students will demonstrate an understanding, in writing, of 1. the thesis; 2. the methods of development; and 3. the methods of persuasion of selected essay models

What is the actual performance? 94% of 2002/03 students completed successfully.

 

Additional information on all six of the College General Education Competencies may be found in section 3.3.1 of this report.

 

Programs make efforts to reinforce these skills throughout a student’s program of study.  Examples of areas that reinforce general education skills in curriculum courses are as follows:

1.      Horticulture

HRT 110 Plant Form and Function

HRT 125 Soils

These courses require research papers and require students to present results of project assignments in class. These projects also require the use of math skills.

2.      Accounting

ACC 101 Accounting Principles I

This course requires a research paper using MLA format.

3.      Industrial Electronics, Automated Manufacturing Technology, and Electronics Engineering Technology

All students must complete (1) written lab projects, (2) circuit analysis (math), and (3) work in teams.

4.      Early Childhood Development

This program requires students to write reviews of internet articles and make oral presentations.

 

Capstone Courses

 

The following programs have capstone courses, which require work that integrates a variety of general education core skills, in particular math, speaking, and writing skills:

 

            Office Systems Technology (CWE 123 Cooperative Work experience II)

            Office Systems Technology-Medical (OST 270 SCWE in Office Systems)

            Horticulture Technology (HRT 230 Greenhouse Technology)

                                                     (HRT 231 Nursery Technology)

                                                     (HRT 253 Landscape Installation)

                                                     (HRT 256 Landscape Management)

 

For example, OST 270 provides OST-Medical students direct experience in a physician's office or other selected medical facilities during the spring semester of their second year.

 

Clinical evaluations are completed by the instructor and preceptor using a clinical rating scale. Clinical evaluations cover the course competencies and upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate interpersonal and professional attributes

  2. Communicate with office staff and clients

  3.  Maintain accurate records

  4. Perform financial transactions

  5. Perform general office duties

  6. Maintain the filing system

  7. Perform receptionist duties

  8. Make appointments

 

The students must post weekly clinical logs to a discussion board. Through the discussion board, they must also respond to a "Discussion Challenge" and respond to two other students. Responses must be meaningful and offer suggestions to receive credit. Students are also expected to spell and punctuate correctly when they write letters, memos, and general correspondence. Students must use proper grammar and vocabulary in their oral communication with staff and clients as well. The students must be able to perform mathematical operations in order to establish payment plans for clients, monitor accounts receivable, and balance charges/payments daily. These activities demonstrate the integration of general education core skills into the capstone course.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.5.1

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog, page 6

 

 

State Program Models—Horticulture

 

 

Management W/ Marketing Electives DACUM

 

 CETL Office

English 101 Syllabus

 

 

Assessment of General Education

 

 

Office Systems Technology 270 Syllabus

 

 

3.5.2    The institution awards degrees only to those students who have earned at least 25 percent of the credit hours required for the degree through instruction offered by that institution.  

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College requires that 25% of the applicable core course work for a chosen degree be taken at STC.  Students may only transfer 75% of the applicable course work from another institution.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.5.2

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog, page 15, Exemption Policy

 

 

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog, page 18, Transferring Credits to STC

 

 

Spartanburg Community College Student Planner & Handbook

       page 73
       pages  77-78, Graduation

 

 

PRO V-40.3

 

 

PRO V-40.5

 

 

PRO V-40.12

 

 

 

3.6  Educational Programs:  Graduate and Post-Baccalaureate Professional

Programs

 

3.6.1    The institution=s post-baccalaureate professional degree programs, and its master=s and doctoral degree programs, are progressively more advanced in academic content than undergraduate programs.   

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  This Standard is not applicable to Spartanburg Community College since the institution does not offer programs or courses beyond the associate degree.

 

3.6.2    The institution ensures that its graduate instruction and resources foster independent learning, enabling the graduate to contribute to a profession or field of study.   

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  This Standard is not applicable to Spartanburg Community College since the institution does not offer programs or courses beyond the associate degree.

 

3.6.3    The majority of credits toward a graduate or a post-baccalaureate professional degree is earned through the institution awarding the degree.  In the case of graduate and post-         baccalaureate professional degree programs offered through joint, cooperative, or consortia arrangements, the student earns a majority of credits from the participating institutions.   

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  This Standard is not applicable to Spartanburg Community College since the institution does not offer programs or courses beyond the associate degree.

 

 

3.7  Faculty

 

3.7.1    The institution employs competent faculty members qualified to accomplish the mission and goals of the institution.  When determining acceptable qualifications of its faculty, an institution gives primary consideration to the highest earned degree in the discipline in accordance with the guidelines listed below.  The institution also considers competence, effectiveness, and capacity, including, as appropriate, undergraduate and graduate degrees, related work experiences in the field, professional licensure and certifications, honors and awards, continuous documented excellence in teaching, or other demonstrated competencies and achievements that contribute to effective teaching and student learning outcomes. For all cases, the institution is responsible for justifying and documenting the qualifications of its faculty.    

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Faculty teaching associate degree courses designed for transfer to a baccalaureate degree or with transfer opportunities have official transcripts on file in the Human Resources Office documenting a minimum of a master’s degree in the teaching discipline or a master’s degree with a concentration in the teaching discipline (a minimum of 18 graduate semester hours in the teaching discipline) as listed in the credential guidelines in the SACS principles for accreditation.  [PRO VI-170.1]

Faculty teaching associate degree courses not designed for transfer to the baccalaureate degree have official transcripts on file in the Human Resources Office documenting the minimum of a baccalaureate degree in the teaching discipline, or an associate degree and demonstrated competencies in the teaching discipline as listed in the credential guidelines in the SACS principles for accreditation.  

For each full-time and adjunct faculty member, the appropriate department head analyzes faculty credentials, including transcripts, and completes a Faculty Credentials Verification form indicating the courses that the faculty member is eligible to teach.  The Vice President of Academic Affairs, deans, and department heads review all Faculty Credentials Verification forms once they are completed.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.7.1

Documentation

On-Campus Location

PRO VI-170.1

 

 

Roster of Instructional Staff

 

 

 

 

3.7.2    The institution regularly evaluates the effectiveness of each faculty member in accord with published criteria, regardless of contractual or tenured status.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  The implementation and documentation process of the Faculty Performance Management System (FPMS) reviews faculty effectiveness, as mandated by the South Carolina Technical College System (SCTCS).  In accordance with the procedural requirements of both the Technical College System and the College, the FPMS annually evaluates permanent faculty in the areas of instructional development, teaching performance, student advisement, College/community service, professional development, and instructional management.  In addition to the FPMS, the appropriate department head, dean, and/or vice president evaluate all faculty members.  Supervisors observe full-time and adjunct faculty in the classroom. [PRO IV-10.13]   

 

Students have the opportunity to evaluate instructors every semester.  The Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL) forwards compilations of the survey to the instructor after grades are posted.  Results of the evaluation become part of the course assessment process. 

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.7.2

Documentation

On-Campus Location

PRO IV-10.13  Faculty Classroom Observation by Supervisor

 

 

PRO IV-10.14  Student Evaluation of Instruction

 

 

PRO IV-10.17  Course Assessment

 

 

PRO VI-280.2  Faculty Performance Management System

 

 

Spartanburg Community College Student Planner & Handbook  2004-2005, page 73

 

 

State Board Policy:  8-4-101 Faculty Performance Management  System

 

 

State Board Procedure: 8-4-101.1 Faculty Performance Management System

 

 

Student Evaluations 

 

CETL Office

Adjunct Faculty Handbook 

 

CETL Office

FPMS evaluations 

 

Human Resource Office

3.7.3    The institution provides evidence of ongoing professional development of faculty as teachers, scholars, and practitioners.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  The State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education (SBTCE) and Spartanburg Community College policies and procedures encourage all faculty members to participate in professional development.  The College encourages and supports financially, where possible, a program of in-service education and training for the professional development of faculty and staff in keeping with rules, regulations, and policy of SBTCE

The College offers various opportunities through the Faculty and Staff Development (FSD) program throughout the calendar year.  In addition, the College may offer tuition assistance to eligible employees. The STC Foundation may also provide funding for professional development opportunities.

Faculty and Staff Development Statistics:

                                                                      Faculty
Year                           FSD Activities         Participants          Budget

                                   Scheduled                In at least 1       Expenditures           

2003/04                                  28                                99%                $31,373         

2002/03                                  21                                98%                $15,095                       

2001/02                                  14                                99%                $17,028

Budget expenditures also include tuition assistance.

 

Title III Statistics:

 

    Participation                                  Cost                

 

Year 1 (2000-01)                               63                                            $ 4,275                      

Year 2 (2001-02)                               67                                            $11,879.22   

Year 3 (2002-03)                               77                                            $11,250         

Year 4 (2003-04)                               78                                            $3,531.40     

Year 5 (2004-05)                               24                                                 **

**not available

 

The FSD Committee consists of 14 persons who represent a cross-section of the College employees, including staff, faculty, and administrative personnel.  FSD Committee members solicit ideas from employees in their divisions and also from the President’s Council.

In addition, STC offers a reimbursement for professional dues.

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.7.3

Documentation

On-Campus Location

POL II-210         Employee Quality Assurance Activities

 

 

POL III-20          Dues in Professional Organizations

 

 

POL III-101        Computer Training

 

 

POL IV-50         Library

 

 

PRO VI-400.1  Faculty and Staff Development

 

 

PRO VI-400.2  Pay Increases Due to Additional Education/Certification

 

 

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog, page 6, College Values

 

 

SBTCE Policy:  8-10-100 Employee Development

 

 

SBTCE Procedure:  8-10-100.1 Employee Development

 

 

FSD Activities participation records 

 

SACS Liaison Office

Title III participation 

 

CETL Office

3.7.4    The institution ensures adequate procedures for safeguarding and protecting academic freedom.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  The College demonstrates commitment to excellence by supporting and defending academic freedom.  The College desires faculty to be free to cultivate an atmosphere of inquiry and scholarly criticism both within and outside the classroom.  The wording of the College’s Policy IV-40 replicates that of SBTCE Policy 3-1-100 – Academic Freedom and Responsibility - Copyright. 

State Policy 3-1-100 states the following:

 

To ensure an instructional program marked by excellence, the South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education supports the concept of academic freedom.  In the development of knowledge, research endeavors, and creative activities, faculty and students must be free to cultivate a spirit of inquiry and scholarly criticism.  The faculty members are entitled to freedom in the classroom in discussing their subject, but they should be careful not to introduce teaching matters which have no relation to their field.  Faculty and students must be able to examine ideas in an atmosphere of freedom and confidence and to participate as responsible citizens in community affairs.

 

The State Tech System also recognizes that commitment to every freedom carries with it attendant responsibilities. The faculty members must fulfill their responsibilities to society and to their profession by manifesting competence, professional discretion, and good citizenship.  When they speak or write as a citizen, they will be free from institutional censorship or discipline, but their special position in the community imposes special obligations.  As professional educators, they must remember that the public may judge their profession and their institution by their utterances.  Hence, they should at all times be accurate, exercise appropriate restraint, show respect for the opinions of others, and make every effort to indicate they are not speaking for the institution.  At no time shall the principles of academic freedom prevent the institution from making proper efforts to assure the best possible instruction for all students in accordance with the objectives of the institution.  Where there are conflicts or inconsistencies between this policy and the Ethics Act of 1991, the provisions of the Ethics Act will take precedence.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.7.4

Documentation

On-Campus Location

POL IV-40      Academic Freedom

 

 

SBTCE Policy: 3-1-100 Academic Freedom and Responsibility – Copyright

 

 

Ethics Act of 1991

 

 

3.7.5        The institution publishes policies on the responsibility and authority of faculty in academic and governance matters.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  The College publishes policies on the responsibility and authority of faculty in academic and governance matters in the Policies and Procedures Manual as well as in the College catalog and The Student Code for the South Carolina Technical College System.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.7.5

Documentation

On-Campus Location

POL I-20           Faculty/Staff Organizations

 

 

PRO I-20.1       Faculty/Staff Organizations

 

 

PRO I-60.1       Institutional Effectiveness

 

 

PRO IV-10.1    Classroom Management

 

 

PRO IV-10.9     Awarding “I” Incomplete Grades

 

 

PRO IV-10.17  Course Assessment

 

 

PRO IV-10.18  Curriculum Course Development and Revision

 

 

PRO IV-10.20  Lab Support

 

 

PRO V-10.2      Discipline of Students

 

 

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog, page 6, College Values

 

 

Spartanburg Community College Student Planner & Handbook, Academic Misconduct, pages 102 and 103, Section IV, Part B 1-3

 

 

Spartanburg Community College Student Planner & Handbook, The Student Appeals Committee, page 105, Part D 1

 

 

 

3.8 Library and Other Learning Resources

 

3.8.1    The institution provides facilities, services, and learning/information resources that are appropriate to support its teaching, research, and service mission.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  The Spartanburg Community College library offers a full range of library services and resources in an appropriately equipped facility to support the teaching mission of the College. The library collection and other learning and information resources support the mission and goals of Spartanburg Community College and are consistent with the degrees offered at the College. Spartanburg Community College provides the library adequate funding for materials, staff resources, and other operating expenses. The library’s Annual Improvement Plan evaluates the degree of the library’s success in meeting its mission each year and uses the evaluation in planning for the next year.  The library markets its resources and services to faculty, staff, and students via College publications, such as the College catalog and student handbook. The library uses the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) Standards for Libraries in Higher Education as the benchmark for its facilities, services, and resources.  Based on these standards, the library has adequate facilities, budgetary support, services, and learning/information resources.

 

Resources

At the end of the 2003/2004 fiscal year, the library held 41,707 books, 3,534 audiovisual materials, and 273 current subscriptions to paper journal titles. The library also offers access to over 38,000 e-book titles. The library’s online public catalog, Unicorn, provides bibliographic access to the library collection and to other on-campus departmental holdings.

 

The library has available over 20 electronic databases supplying subject coverage for all Spartanburg Community College programs, providing online access to over 12,600 periodical titles. Most databases have full-text periodical and newspaper coverage. These electronic resources match those of other peer institutions. Faculty, staff, students, and community patrons can access all databases from their offices and homes. The library website serves as a gateway for using the library's resources, both print and online.  The library presents evaluated research material in an organized manner that facilitates patron use. Specialized research guides exist for each College program and are easily accessible both on and off campus through the library web page. The library also provides access to information resources on the Internet.  Interlibrary loan services provide access to materials not owned by the institution. In the last Patron Library Evaluation Questionnaire in 2003, 97% of those surveyed indicated satisfaction with the library collection. In addition, 87.7% of students surveyed for the March 2004 ACT Student Opinion Survey expressed satisfaction with the Library/Learning Resources Center Facilities and Services. Compared with its peer institutions, the library’s collections are appropriate to support its teaching, research, and service mission. [STC Library Peer Group Comparison Report (Collection Size)]

 

Recent visiting teams from professional accreditation agencies that evaluate specific curriculum programs have judged the library’s collections and resources as more than adequate.  Programs recently evaluated included Engineering Technology (ABET), Nursing (ADN), Radiologic Sciences (Radiography/Radiation Therapy), Pharmacy Technician, Culinary Arts, Expanded Duty Dental Assisting (formerly Dental Assisting), and Business Technology.

 

Services

The library provides a wide range of library services to its students, faculty, and staff, including distance learning. These include circulation of learning resources, reserves, reference assistance, interlibrary loan, group and individual library instruction, laptop computer checkout, Ask-A-Librarian, photocopiers, and training in the development of information literacy skills. The library provides training in identifying and evaluating Internet resources through its library instruction program. In the 2003/2004 academic year, as part of its interlibrary loan services, the library processed over 437 interlibrary loan transactions for faculty, staff, and students

 

Library users have the opportunity to evaluate these library services and offer input on a regular basis through a variety of student, faculty, and staff surveys. In the last Patron Library Evaluation Questionnaire in 2003, 100% of those surveyed indicated satisfaction with the library services.  A Library Advisory Committee, representing the academic divisions, meets regularly with the Dean of Learning Resources to provide input on library planning and activities.  Library staff also meet regularly with academic department heads on campus for faculty and program input into library activities and acquisitions.

 

Facilities

Located in the Tracy Gaines Learning Resource Center, the library currently houses 41,707 volumes in a 14,551-square-foot facility with seating capacity for 330. The library has a state-of-the-art teaching classroom equipped with 30 workstations and the latest technology for visual presentations. In addition, the library has a 22-workstation open research lab and reference research area with an additional 14 workstations, including one workstation equipped for visually impaired students, providing access to evaluated online resources. The library offers wireless technology and currently has five laptops available for students to check out and use while in the library. A group study room equipped for watching video and DVD materials, as well as for receiving Education Television broadcasts, is also available. A designated quiet study area with 1,705 square feet of space and seating for 65 is available as a response to recommendations received on library patron surveys.

 

Based on the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) Standards for Libraries in Higher Education, the library possesses adequate space to house its collections, provide staff space for offices and workspace, and provide sufficient seating for the College’s current student population.  Although the current library floor space is less than that of its peer institutions, it does meet or exceed the amount of space recommended by the standard for a college of STC’s size and enrollment. The most recent survey of library patrons also indicates their satisfaction with the library facility, with 100% of those responding indicating their overall satisfaction with the library and over 98% indicating satisfactory space to sit and read. Students surveyed for the March 2004 ACT Student Opinion Survey  indicated 87.7% satisfaction with the Library/Learning Resources Center Facilities and Services. Based on the College’s current growth, the College expects to outgrow the current library facility within the next few years. Anticipating this need, several years ago the College began planning for construction of a new library facility.

 

The College is scheduled to begin construction on a new 43,000-square-foot library/academic building in Spring 2005.  The College has secured funding for this construction, selected an architect and builder, and developed plans. The College expects to complete the new library/academic building by Fall 2006. [STC New Library Academic Facility Timeline] Once completed, the new library/academic building will provide sufficient space (over 22,000 square feet for the library) and facilities to accommodate future student population growth and collection growth.

 

Other College Learning/Information Resources

Other areas that provide learning resources to students, faculty, and/or staff include the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning (CETL), the Assistive Technology Lab, the Foreign Language Lab, the Open Computer Lab, the Tutorial Learning Center (TLC), and other computer labs.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.8.1

Documentation

STC Library Annual Improvement Plan

ACRL (Association of College & Research Libraries) Standards for Libraries in Higher Education

STC Library E-book Usage Report

STC Library Database Statistics 2002-2003

STC Library Web Site

STC Library Research Guides

STC Library Interlibrary Loan Services

STC Library Patron Evaluation Questionnaire

March 2004 ACT Student Opinion Survey

STC Library Peer Group Comparison Report (Collection Size)

Engineering Technology (ABET) Accreditation Library Report

Nursing (ADN) Accreditation Library Report

Radiologic Sciences (Radiography/Radiation Therapy) Accreditation Library Report

Culinary Arts Accreditation Library Report

Expanded Duty Dental Assisting (formerly Dental Assisting) Accreditation Library Report

Business Technology Accreditation Report

STC Library Services

STC Library Instruction

Ask-A-Librarian

STC Library Peer Group Comparison Report (Square Footage)

STC Library Facility Assessment Fall 2004 Report

STC New Library Academic Facility Timeline

STC Student Disability Services

STC Open Computer Lab

STC Tutorial Learning Center

 

3.8.2    The institution ensures that users have access to regular and timely instruction in the use of the library and other learning/information resources.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College Library provides instruction in the use of the library and other learning/information resources through a variety of library and information literacy instruction programs taught by professional, MLS- credentialed library staff. Instruction takes place in the library instruction classroom, campus classrooms, and labs and to distance learning students through compressed video, multimedia, and WebCT software. Library instruction offers both general information literacy skills and subject-specific research skills. Most sessions include time for hands-on training. Students also receive one-on-one instruction both in person and online using the Ask-a-Librarian reference service. Students may also request individual assistance from library staff. This instruction program has proven to be very successful. Ninety-five percent of students responding to the Spring 2004 Library Orientation Survey stated library instruction was useful for the course in which they were enrolled. In a comparison of peer institutions, library instruction is appropriate to support the teaching mission of the College.

 

The College’s Institutional Effectiveness Plan supports this standard by requiring that all diploma programs “will require at least six library assignments, and associate degree programs will require at least twelve library assignments in their programs. Certificate programs will require at least four library assignments. Assessment of this standard is included in the program review process.” According to the 2003-04 STC Library Assignment Report all academic programs currently meet or exceed this standard. One of the College’s listed student outcomes is that all students who graduate from an associate degree program demonstrate proficiency in information literacy. According to the 2002-03 STC Graduate & Employer Follow-Up Survey, 95% of students surveyed responded they were prepared to use library/information resources. In addition, 99% of employers surveyed rated STC graduates above average in their ability to use information resources.

 

In 2003/2004, 209 bibliographic instruction sessions were taught to 4,205 students.  In addition, 76 classes with 1,253 students returned to the library for continued research on their own. The STC library instruction classroom is a state-of-the-art “smart classroom” allowing hands-on instruction at 30 student workstations. The library facility has 72 total computer workstations for student use including the instruction classroom, an online research lab with 22 workstations, a reference research area with 14 workstations, and 6 other task-specific workstations (2 occupational safety and health training, 2 computer graphics, 2 library catalog), giving students the opportunity to use the latest technology for research.

 

The library also offers online library instruction classes to be used with online courses taught at STC. Courses may be fully online or online supplements to traditional classroom instruction. Each library instruction class is customized for the subject area being taught. Currently 23 courses have added this library instruction class to their course. Over 256 online students have received online library instruction. In a survey of students using the WebCT library instruction class, 91% of students responding found the tutorials useful in completing their assignment and 96% would recommend the WebCT Library Orientation class to other students with their same assignment. 

 

Information Systems

The College’s Distance Learning program provides basic training and support for WebCT, a program used to offer online and online-supplemented classes.  It offers two orientation sessions with basic WebCT training each semester for students enrolled in online classes and has begun offering several WebCT workshops for students.  An online orientation for WebCT and several how-to’s for students and faculty are available on the Distance Learning website.  Distance Learning also offers individual and group learning opportunities to faculty, targeted at improving their technical knowledge related to teaching online.

 

The College’s Faculty Staff Development (FSD) and Title III programs both offer various technology training workshops and classes each year for both faculty and staff.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.8.2

Documentation

STC Library Orientation Survey

STC Graduate Survey

STC Library Peer Group Comparison Report (Library Instruction)

STC Library AIP

STC Library Assignment Report

STC Library WebCT Online Course Survey

STC College Mission Statement

STC Student Outcomes

FSD Workshop List

STC Library Orientation Web Page

STC Library Ask-a-Librarian Web Page

STC Distance Education Web Site

PRO IV-50.3 Library Services

3.8.3    The institution provides a sufficient number of qualified staff—with appropriate education or experiences in library and/or other learning/information resources—to accomplish the mission of the institution.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College recognizes the American Library Association’s accredited master’s degree in library science (MLS) as the standard for professional librarians. The library staff includes the Dean of the Learning Resource Center with an MLS, two full-time MLS-credentialed library faculty, one reference specialist with a library certificate (part-time), one administrative specialist for the Learning Resource Center, and three full-time library technical assistants. All employees have the appropriate qualifications for their positions. Library personnel are professional in meeting their obligations to the student body and the faculty and staff. Library faculty and staff continue to update their professional knowledge and skills via additional training, workshops, and conferences. Performance evaluations are conducted on an annual basis for both library faculty and staff as outlined by College policy. 

 

The library staff provide necessary library resources and services, including patron registration; materials circulation; readers advisory, reference, and assistance services; library instruction sessions; interlibrary loans, and loans to members of the medical, business, and industrial communities. Library staff also maintain the Library web page, select appropriate online resources, and create customized research guides for patron use. The staffing levels at Spartanburg Community College allow for 63 hours per week of full-time library service, with a professional librarian on duty at all times during weekly operational hours. Library faculty and staff work closely with faculty to support program and curriculum needs.

 

The 2003 Patron Library Evaluation Questionnaire demonstrates faculty, staff and students’ level of satisfaction with the availability (99%) and competence of the library faculty staff (100%). In comparisons with peer institutions, the library’s staffing is comparable and supports the teaching mission of the College.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.8.3

Documentation

American Library Association’s Statement on Certification and Licensing of Academic Librarians

PRO VI-280 1 EPMS

PRO VI-280 2 FMPS

STC Library Web Site

STC Library Research Guides

STC College Mission

Dean Learning Resource Center

Public Service Librarian

Technical Services Librarian

Administrative Specialist

Library Technical Assistant ILL Serials

Library Technical Assistant Processing

Library Technical Assistant Evening

STC Library Patron Evaluation Questionnaire

STC Library Peer Group Comparison Report (Staff)

 

3.9 Student Affairs and Services

 

3.9.1    The institution publishes a clear and appropriate statement of student rights and responsibilities and disseminates the statement to the campus community.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College publishes and disseminates comprehensive guidelines in reference to student rights and responsibilities.  The student handbook lists these guidelines which include the Student Code for Spartanburg Community College and the Student Grievance Procedure for Spartanburg Community College.  The student code, based on the Student Code for the South Carolina Technical College System, covers student rights and responsibilities as related to student academics, student records, and student conduct.  It includes the grievance procedure and due process information and is in compliance with student rights guaranteed by federal (FERPA) and state laws.  The College catalog under “Student Due Process” and the College’s website include additional statements regarding this issue. 

 

The Vice President of Student Affairs reviews the student handbook, College catalog, College website, and supporting documents on a yearly basis to provide faculty, staff, and students with the most up-to-date information regarding student rights and responsibilities.

 

The handbook and the catalog are distributed campus-wide and are readily available to faculty, staff, and students.  New students receive the handbook when they are accepted or when they pay tuition at the business office.  Also, the catalog and handbook are available in the admissions office and via the College’s website.      

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.9.1

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg Community College Student Planner & Handbook 2004-2005, pages 95-113, "The Student Code for Spartanburg Community College" and "The Student Grievance Procedure for Spartanburg Community College"

 

 

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog, page 35, “Student Due Process”

 

 

Go to www.stcsc.edu <At a Glance> <Publications>

 

 

3.9.2    The institution protects the security, confidentiality, and integrity of its student records.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  The College protects the security, confidentiality, and integrity of its student records at the collection point, in use, and in storage and disposal.   Supervisors in the Admissions Office, Records Office, Financial Aid Office, Business Office, Continuing Education Office, and other offices that house student records provide training for employees regarding the privacy rights of individuals and the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), as well as the responsibility of College employees to protect the security, confidentiality, and integrity of student records.  These employees have received on-campus training in FERPA, made available by the Human Resources Office of the College through its Faculty/Staff Development program.  All Spartanburg Community College employees who have access to the data base must sign a Data Responsibility Acceptance Form, agreeing not to reveal their password; not to reveal any financial or personal data on students, faculty, staff, or departmental budget; and not to leave their workstation computer logged on and unattended for any length of time.

 

Each office that retains student records abides by the guidelines on privacy rights and confidentiality found in the Spartanburg Community College Policies and Procedures Manual (PRO V-50.4), the Spartanburg Community College Student Planner & Handbook 2004-2005, and the South Carolina General Records Retention Schedule for State Colleges and Universities.  The manual is available to each employee through Microsoft Outlook’s Public Folders option under Human Resources.  The student planner/handbook is available to all faculty, staff, and students throughout each academic year.  The State of South Carolina’s records retention schedule is available in the office of the Dean of Enrollment Management.  Through the information available on privacy rights and policies in the student planner/handbook, the College endeavors to inform the student population of the College’s policies and its efforts to assure their records remain  private and confidential.

 

Security of Student Records

The Admissions Office, Student Records Office, Financial Aid Office, Business Office, and Continuing Education Office have procedures in place to provide for the security of student records.  Admissions, Student Records, Financial Aid, and the Business Office have separate file rooms in which they keep paper copies of student records.  These file rooms contain locked file cabinets, and only authorized personnel can access the rooms.  The rooms are in areas that have no through-traffic from students or other unauthorized personnel.  Only authorized personnel have access to Continuing Education’s file cabinets; these are locked during non-business hours and unlocked during business hours. 

In addition, several offices have moved or are moving to electronic formatting of student records via the College’s imaging system.  The imaging system is password-protected, and each employee has his or her own unique password to access this system and the College’s database.  The employee must change the password every six months to maintain security.  In the Financial Aid Office, only necessary supporting documentation is in a locked file room.  Once the other documents have been scanned into the imaging system, these documents are shredded.  The College’s Information Technology (IT) department is responsible for the daily backup of all documents created or changed in the imaging system and the database, a system known as incremental backup.  Every weekend, the IT department conducts a full backup of all critical systems and stores these tapes in a vault located in a fire-rated computer room on campus.  An off-campus location in Duncan, South Carolina, is responsible for the backup and storage of the College’s administrative database.  Although security measures are standard operating procedure for the Information Technology department, the compliance certification team discovered that the College has no written procedure.  The team recommended writing such a procedure, and it will be approved before May 2005.

 

In addition, students have access to their records electronically via WebAdvisor, which allows them to check their final grades, class schedules, financial aid, and student accounts.  This password-protected system requires students to change their passwords every three months.  The College provides students with a password-protected e-mail account via Campus Cruiser.

 

Confidentiality of Student Records

Admissions, Student Records, Financial Aid, Business Office, and Continuing Education have procedures in place to ensure the strict confidentiality of student records.  Paper copies of student information are in file cabinets that authorized personnel lock at the end of each business day and unlock during business hours.  The College follows the procedures and timeline set by the State of South Carolina for the secure destruction and disposal of student records.  A state-approved records disposal service provides for the pickup and shredding of all confidential documents for the College.

 

Integrity of Student Records

When students request copies of their records (such as transcripts and placement test results), the students must complete and sign a request form with the necessary personal information to verify their identity.  The College keeps the forms on file for the required amount of time as detailed in the State of South Carolina’s records retention schedule.  The College will not release student records without the student’s written permission.

 

In addition, the Continuing Education Office is currently working with the Information Technology and Student Records departments to produce an official transcript.  When the College finalizes this process, Continuing Education students will follow the same process as curriculum students to request a transcript.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.9.2

Documentation

On-Campus Location

PRO V-50.4

 

 

Spartanburg Community College Student Planner/ Handbook 2004-2005, pages 83, 84, and 98

 

 

General Records Retention Schedule for State Colleges and Universities, page 30, Subarticle 9, item number 12-809.10

 

 

Spartanburg Community College Financial Aid Office Policies and Procedures Manual, 3.6.1

 

 

3.9.3    The institution provides services supporting its mission with qualified personnel to ensure the quality and effectiveness of its student affairs programs.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College employs qualified personnel in the Student Affairs Division to ensure the quality and effectiveness of its Student Affairs programs.  All professional staff members hold appropriate degrees or possess the appropriate combination of educational and work experience to hold these positions.

 

A position description form, which states the minimum requirements and job functions for each staff person, is available in the Human Resources Office. Human Resources personnel maintain the job applications and transcripts, if required, that document the official certification of experience and education.  All employees must meet at least minimum requirements for their position.

 

The College uses the State of South Carolina Employee Performance Management System (EPMS) to evaluate the performance of all classified employees, educational support personnel, and institutional officers who occupy permanent positions.  Annually, College supervisors evaluate all employees and give them a written assessment of attainment of success criteria for each job duty.  Supervisors may add additional objectives each year.  The rating system for performance appraisal is as follows: Exceeds, Satisfactory, and Below.  Employees receive a summary that identifies major accomplishments, areas needing improvement, and steps to improve present and future performance.  Employees may comment on appraisal results.

 

The Dean of Enrollment Management,  Director of Counseling, Admissions Coordinator, individual counselors, Director of Financial Aid, Director of Recruitment, Director of Career Planning and Placement, Coordinator of Student Activities,  Director of Success Network, and the Coordinator of the AIM Center all have held or hold offices and/or positions in professional organizations specific to their areas of interest. For example, the Director of Financial Aid is President-Elect of the South Carolina Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators; the Director of Career Planning and Placement was Vice Chairman and Chairman of the Career Planning and Placement Peer Group, and Chairman and Secretary of the Mayors Committee for the Employment of People with Disabilities. 

 

Enrollment Services

The Admissions, Counseling, and Disability Services, the Records Office, and the Financial Aid and Veterans Assistance Office report to the Vice President of Student Affairs.

 

The Vice President of Student Affairs directly supervises the Dean of Enrollment Management. The Dean of Enrollment Management supervises the Director of Counseling and Admissions Coordinator. The Dean of Enrollment Management also oversees the operations in the Records Office. The Director of Counseling provides direct supervision to five professional staff members.  The Admissions Coordinator provides direct supervision to six staff members.

 

The Admissions and Counseling Department promotes student success by fostering academic, career, and personal development.  The Admissions and Counseling Department admits to the College all applicants who can benefit from available learning opportunities; it also designs and implements intake, support, and transition services that effectively impact identified student goals and outcomes.

 

The Office of Disability Services acts as an advocate for students with disabilities and as a technical advisor to faculty and staff on issues of reasonable accommodation and auxiliary aids and services.  The counselor in this office makes presentations to students with disabilities in addition to providing resources to enhance retention and graduation rates.

 

Every other year, Spartanburg Community College randomly selects class sections to complete the ACT Student Opinion Survey for 2-Year Colleges in order to assess student satisfaction at the College.   The most recent report compares data from 1996 through 2004; in addition, the report compares 2004 data to the national norm for two-year colleges with student populations of 4,000 to 9,999.  A total of 489 STC students completed the 2004 survey.  Those students surveyed provided the following information regarding the Admissions environment. Seventy percent or more of students surveyed indicated that they were satisfied with general admissions/entry procedures (National norm 67.5%).  Student satisfaction regarding the assistance provided by the College staff upon entrance showed 70.1% satisfaction (National norm 62.6%).  Of students surveyed regarding college catalog/admissions publications, 72.8% were satisfied (National norm 70.2%).  A hard copy of the survey is available in the Office of Institutional Effectiveness.

 

The Dean of Enrollment Management supervises the Records Office, which consists of three staff members and one part-time employee. The December 2004 applicant/student satisfaction profile rating of satisfaction with services reported 95% were satisfied with the information and services they received from this office.

 

The Financial Aid Office coordinates the delivery of all funds from all sources to students, as required by federal regulations. The department manages a variety of programs that provide funds and benefits for students, such as grants, loans, and scholarships.   The Director supervises three professional staff members and four classified staff members. The ACT Survey regarding Financial Aid services indicated 73.4% satisfaction (National norm 71.2%). Sixty-nine percent or more of students surveyed indicated satisfaction with the availability of financial aid information prior to enrolling at Spartanburg Community College.  The Veterans Affairs Office coordinates services for VA students, active duty service personnel, and eligible dependents. 

 

Student Support Services

Employees in the Career Planning and Placement Center, Recruitment Services, AIM Center (federally funded program), and Success Network (federally funded programs) report to the Vice President of Student Services. The Cooperative Program for the Deaf and Blind office is on the Spartanburg Community College campus, and the Coordinator reports to the Director of Career Technology Education at the South Carolina School for the Deaf and Blind.

 

The staff of the Career Planning and Placement Center consists of two professionals and a classified staff member.  The mission of the Career Planning and Placement Office is to provide students and graduates of Spartanburg Community College with comprehensive employment opportunity services.  An internal Customer Satisfaction form rated services provided by this office as 99% “good” or “excellent.” Results of the ACT Survey indicated 74.3% satisfaction (National norm 67.9%) with the services provided.

 

The Office of Recruitment Services is responsible for planning, implementing, and evaluating recruiting activities and services.  The Student Activities Coordinator manages activities external to the classroom.  The Director, who supervises the Recruiter/Student Activities Coordinator, staffs the Office of Recruitment Services.  Students surveyed indicate 70.0% satisfaction (National norm 65.8%) with college-sponsored social activities.

 

The Carl D. Perkins Vocational-Technology Education Act of 1998 funds the AIM Center (aspiration, inspiration, and motivation.)  The program offers assistance with books, childcare, educational supplies, and transportation assistance. Students who receive these services must either be economically disadvantaged, have limited English proficiency, be single parents, displaced homemakers, single pregnant women, individuals with disabilities, or be students enrolled in non-traditional programs. The program Coordinator is responsible for one classified staff member. 

 

The total number of student visits to the AIM center during the Fall 2004 semester was 1,192. This number includes students requesting counseling and/or assistance and those participating in workshops.  An internal student survey relating to the services offered by the staff indicated that 94% of the respondents were satisfied with the services. The comments indicated staff is courteous, knowledgeable, and willing to assist students in any way necessary.

 

The Success Network program is a Federal TRIO Program designed to provide educational outreach opportunities and support services to students from disadvantaged backgrounds.  The program employs a full-time Program Coordinator, Counselor, Learning Disability Specialist/Tutor Coordinator, and Administrative Assistant.  At the end of each semester, students served by the program receive a survey to rate the services provided by this office. The results of the Fall 2004 student survey indicated 99% satisfaction with workshop and tutoring services. 

 

An agreement between Spartanburg Community College and The South Carolina School for the Deaf and Blind (SCSDB) established the Cooperative Program for the Deaf and Blind.  The services and accommodations include sign language interpreters; note takers; readers/writers; accommodations; adaptive technology counseling; personal, educational, and career counseling; and priority registration.  The Coordinator’s office is on the Spartanburg Community College campus.   The results of students surveyed in the spring of 2004 indicated that 92% of the respondents rated the services “above average” and “excellent.”

Student Services Professional Staff

 

Title

Name

Degrees

Years at STC

Other Higher Education Years

Total Higher Education Years

Vice President, Student Services

Harold McClain

B.A., Sociology, Claflin College, M.Ed.; Personnel Services*, Clemson University

31 years

0

31 years

Dean of Enrollment Management

Celia Bauss

B.S., Sociology/English, Clemson University; M.Ed., Community and Occupational Education, University of South Carolina

23 years

1 year

24 years

 

Admissions

 

 

 

 

Director of  Counseling

Geraldine Brantley

B.A., Education-Elementary Education; M.Ed., Elementary School Guidance, University of South Carolina; National Certified Counselor, Licensed Professional Counselor State of South Carolina, Licensed Professional Counselor Supervisor, National Certified School Counselor

1 year 

2 mths

20 years

21 years 

2 months

Admissions Coordinator

Michael Harvey

B.S., Business Administration; B.S., Psychology, University of South Carolina

5 years 

2 mths

0

5 years 

2 months

Counselor/Special Projects Coordinator

Tim Howard

B.S., Psychology; M.Ed., Student Personnel Services, University of South Carolina; National Board Certified Counselor

20 years 6 mths

0

20 years 

6 months

Counselor

Phyllis Rogers

B.A., Sociology, Winthrop College; M.Ed., Personnel Services*, Clemson University

24 years 4 mths

0

24 years

4 months

Counselor, Student Disability Services

Gina Parris

B.A., Guidance and Counseling/Psychology, Limestone College; M.A.Ed., School Counseling, Western Carolina University

14 years 10 mths

0

14 years

10 months

Counselor

Carla Stewart

B.S. Sociology, Lander University

3 years

1 year

6 months

4 years 

6 months

Counselor

Ricky Fields

B.S., Accounting;  M.Ed., Education, South Carolina State University

2 mths

3 years**

3 years

2 months

 

Recruitment Services

 

 

 

 

Coordinator of Recruiting Services

Reginald Wilburn

B.A. Business Administration, Furman University; M.Ed., Community and Occupational Programs, University of South Carolina

15 years 9 mths

0

15 years

9 months

Recruiter/Student Activities Coordinator

Kerri McAlister

B.A. Communications/ Public Relations, Lee University

1 year

0

1 year

 

Financial Aid

 

 

 

 

Director

Nancy Garmroth

M.B.A. Winthrop University; B.S., Business Administration, Francis Marion University

8 years

3 mths 

11 years

19 years

3 months

Assistant Director

Angela Fowler

A.A.S., Office Systems Technology; A.A.S., Arts, Spartanburg Community College; B.S., Business Administration, University of South Carolina-Spartanburg

13 years 4 mths 

0

13 years

4 months

Counselor

Michelle Schultz

B.A., Psychology, Grove City College; Ed.M, School Counseling, Univ. of Buffalo

3 mths

0

3 months

Counselor

Denise Chestnut-Walker

B.S., Retail Management, University of South Carolina; M.B.A., Webster University

1 month

0

1 month

 

Career Planning and Placement

 

 

 

 

Director

Kathy McKinzie

B.A., English/History, Murray State University; M.A.Ed., Education, Tusculum College

8 years 11 mths

12 years

20  years 11 mths

Job Development Coordinator

Douglas Brackett

B.A., Social Science, Allen University; M.Ed., Education, University of South Carolina

33 years 5 mths

0

33 years

5 mths

 

Success Network

 

 

 

 

Director

Kathy J. Chambers

B.A., Social Sciences, Winthrop College; M.Ed., Student Personnel Services, University of South Carolina

6 years

6 mths 

6 years

12 years 

6 months

Learning Disabilities Specialist/Tutor Coordinator

Janis Hendrickson

B.A., History/Education, Mars Hill College; M.A., Education, Furman University

7 years

2 mths 

16 years

23 years 

2 months

Counselor

Detria Long

B.A., Interdisciplinary Studies, University of South Carolina

2 years

24 years

26 years

 

AIM Center

 

 

 

 

Coordinator, Perkins III

Leila McKinney

B.S., Psychology, Wofford College; M.Ed., Education, Converse College

6 years

2 mths 

12 years

18 years 

2 months

 

* At the time of the awarding of these degrees Personnel Services was Clemson University’s Student Personnel Service degree.

 

** Adjunct Faculty teaching position

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.9.3

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Position Description Forms 

 

Human Resources Office

PRO VI-280.1

 

 

ACT Student Opinion Survey for 2-Year Colleges

 

 

Supporting Data for Core Requirement 2.10 and Comprehensive Standard 3.9.3 

 

SACS Liaison Office

 

RESOURCES

 

3.10  Financial and Physical Resources

 

3.10.1  The institution=s recent financial history demonstrates financial stability.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College is audited regularly by independent, experienced, and objective auditors. Recent audits have passed the objective evaluation of these auditors.

 

The College’s current ratio of current assets to current liabilities has remained around two, showing that liquid assets can meet short-term obligations twice.  Total Debt to Total Assets has remained between 30% to 40%, indicating that only 30%-40% of the total assets are obligated against total debt. These ratios have remained at relatively the same value for three years. This indicates financial stability. [Auditor’s Report]

 

The Year End Budget Summary Reports indicate that each fiscal year has ended with a surplus, with revenues exceeding expenditures in each of the three years. In addition, planned and required 30-day cash reserves have been exceeded each of the preceding years. The Director of Institutional Research and the Vice President of Business Affairs monitor and report this monthly to the area commission.

  

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.10.1

Documentation

Independent Auditor’s Report, Financial Statements For the Year Ended:

June 30, 2002

June 30, 2003

June 30, 2004

 

Year End Budget Summary For The Year Ended:

June 30, 2002

June 30, 2003

June 30, 2004

 

Spartanburg County Area Commission Minutes - Budget Status Report as of:

May 31, 2002

May 31, 2003

May 31, 2004

 

3.10.2  The institution provides financial statements and related documents, including multiple measures for determining financial health as requested by the Commission, that accurately and appropriately represent the total operation of the institution.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College provides a variety of financial statements and related documents designed to measure the financial health and accurately reflect the total operation of the College. These documents include the annual Independent Auditor’s Report (conducted by a contracted accounting firm), a summary budget review provided to the Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education at each meeting (produced by the Development Office’s Institutional Research department), the annual Finance and Institutional Characteristics surveys of the IPEDS reports (as completed by the Director of Finance and the Director of Institutional Research, respectively), and the annual Institutional Profile for Financial Information (completed by the Director of  Institutional Research) as required by the Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools.  These documents meet or exceed all federal, state, and local government requirements for reporting financial information, fiscal responsibility and accountability, and financial health. Recent STC financial history demonstrates financial stability as shown in the SACS Compliance Reports Core Requirement 2.11.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.10.2

Documentation

Independent Auditor’s Report, Financial Statements For the Year Ended:

June 30, 2002

June 30, 2003

June 30, 2004

 

Spartanburg County Area Commission Minutes -Budget Status Report as of:

May 31, 2002

May 31, 2003

May 31, 2004

 

Finance Survey (IPEDS):

2001

2002

2003

 

Institutional Characteristics Survey (IPEDS) FY 04-05

 

3.10.3  The institution audits financial aid programs as required by federal and state regulations.

 

   Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Financial aid programs are audited during the College’s annual financial audit. The independent CPAs “audit the compliance of Spartanburg Community College with the types of compliance requirements described in the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-133 Compliance Supplement that are applicable to each of its major federal programs.” [Auditor’s Report]

 

Federal and state regulations require Spartanburg Community College to comply with the laws, regulations, contracts, and grants applicable to each of its major federal programs.

 

The compliance audit is also conducted “in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America; the standards applicable to financial audits contained in Government Auditing Standards, issued by the Comptroller General of the U.S., OMB Circular A-133, Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations.” [Auditor’s Report]

 

The South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education and the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education also audit the College. The US Department of Education requires a Fiscal Operation Report and Application to Participate Report (FISAP).

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.10.3

Documentation

Independent Auditors’ Report Required by Government Auditing Standards and the Single Audit Act and the State Lottery Assistance Program: Schedule of Expenditures of Federal Awards For The Year :

2002

2003

2004

Circular No. A-133-Audits of States, Local Governments, and Non-Profit Organizations 

 

2001-2002 South Carolina Commission on Higher Education Audit Letter

 

South Carolina Commission on Higher Education’s Audit Policy and Procedures for Scholarship and Grants

 

Fiscal Operation Report and Application to Participate (FISAP) Report

 

3.10.4  The institution exercises appropriate control over all its financial and physical resources.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College has policies and procedures in place that demonstrate appropriate control over its financial and physical resources and is able to provide evidence supporting these controls.  The budget planning process as outlined in Procedure III-10.13, an annual financial audit by an independent CPA firm, periodic internal audits by the South Carolina State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education auditors, as well as periodic audits by federal and state grantors are examples of these controls.  Minutes to the Budget Meetings provide evidence of compliance.

 

The College also has a procedure in place for check signing authority.  Procedure III-10.8 states that each check requires two signatures as listed in the procedure.  A sample check transmittal document is one example of compliance with Comprehensive Standard 3.10.4. 

 

In addition, the College outlines its control of College and sponsor-owned equipment in Procedure III-10.1.  All equipment is tagged so annual physical inventories can be conducted in all departments to determine the status of assigned equipment.  Procedure III-10.1 also outlines dollar amounts of items to be inventoried.  Spot checks are conducted on a periodic basis to ensure the accuracy of the Inventory File.  Annually, the South Carolina Technical College System audits the College’s equipment.  

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.10.4

Documentation

Procedure III-10.13 – Budget Process

 

Budget Meeting Minutes for FY 2004/2005 – Spring 2004

 

Procedure III-10.8 – Check Signing Authority

 

Check Transmittal Document

 

Independent Auditors Report – Year End 2004

 

Procedure III-10.1 – Property Management and Control

 

2004 SBTCE Equipment Inventory Audit & Management Response

 

3.10.5  The institution maintains financial control over externally funded or sponsored research and programs.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College has policies and procedures in place that demonstrate appropriate control over externally funded programs.  Policy VI-440 and Procedure  VI-440.1, Temporary Grant Positions, and Policy II-120 and Procedure II-120.1, Grants and Contracts, ensure such control. 

 

The Grants Office monitors and reports on externally funded programs. These programs are subject to the same controls mentioned in Comprehensive Standard 3.10.4.  The programs are subject to audit during the annual financial audit.  For the prior three years, the auditors have viewed the annual financial audit and have issued an unqualified audit report.  Grants are also subject to audits by external reporting agencies such as the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education.

 

The College does not have sponsored research.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.10.5

Documentation

Policy VI-440  Temporary Grant Positions

 

Procedure VI-440.1  Temporary Grant Positions

 

Policy II- 120  Grants and Contracts Resource Planning, Development and Management

 

Procedure II-120.1  Grants and Contracts Resource Planning, Development and Management

 

Independent Auditor’s Reports Required by Government Auditing Standards and the Single Audit Act and the State Lottery Tuition Assistance Program, Schedule Of Expenditures of Federal Awards:  for the Year Ended:  

June 30, 2002

June 30, 2003

June 30, 2004

 

South Carolina Commission on Higher Education Audit Policy and Procedures for Scholarships and Grants

3.10.6  The institution takes reasonable steps to provide a healthy, safe, and secure environment for all members of the campus community.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  At Spartanburg Community College, Public Safety, Human Resources, and Physical Plant work together to provide a healthy, safe, and secure environment in support of the College mission.

 

The Executive Vice President of Business Affairs is responsible for writing the policies and procedures for a healthy, safe, and secure campus community.  The Spartanburg County Commission for Technical Education and the President’s Council then review and approve these policies and procedures to ensure that they are in the best interest of students, faculty, staff, and the College.

 

Spartanburg Community College employs two full-time Public Safety Officers on duty during   operating hours and contract officers on duty twenty-four hours a day/seven days a week. Both full-time officers are Criminal Justice Academy Division certified Class 1 law enforcement officers as required by South Carolina law and have received commission as state constables. The trained officers can perform first aid, CPR, and the proper disposal of hazardous materials on campus.

 

The Public Safety Officers, who make regular patrols of the campus, have a highly visible presence on campus and are in radio contact with police, fire, and EMS.  The College installed emergency call boxes as well as cameras that monitor designated areas.  At night, the campus uses appropriate lighting to maintain safety.

 

The College publishes crime awareness information as required by Student-Right-To-Know and Campus Security Act, Public Law 101-542, and distributes it in a Safety Watch brochure to each student during orientation.  The information is also available on the College’s website, in Admissions, and in the Public Safety Office.  In addition, the Safety Watch brochure offers tips on preventing crime, obtaining emergency help, and reporting crime.

 

The College catalog contains a statement describing security services, identifying the website containing crime reports, and stating the prohibition of alcoholic beverages, illegal drugs, and weapons on campus.

 

The College’s Public Safety Office’s Campus Emergency Safety Plan gives clear instructions for handling the following:  

  • Securing the campus
  • Fire (Procedure VII-70.1, Fire Evacuation Procedures—complies with OSHA General Industry Standards 1910-38)
  • Power failure; building evacuation
  • Serious medical needs (Procedure II-30.1 First-Aid, EMS Procedures)
  • Inclement/severe weather
  • Hazardous communications
  • Hazardous materials incidents
  • Chemical spills
  • Blood borne pathogens/ bio-hazard exposure
  • Suspicious mail and bomb threat procedures. 

 

The Campus Safety Plan is available in the Public Safety Office, and through the College’s Public Folders.  Copies are also available for distribution.

 

Public Safety employees work closely with both Physical Plant employees and a representative from the State Accident Fund to comply with OSHA regulations and create a safe environment for the campus community.

 

Physical Plant is responsible for identifying and removing of asbestos on campus.  In 1993, Davis & Floyd, Inc. Consulting Engineers in Greenwood, SC, inspected the campus.  After Davis & Floyd, Inc. tested all suspected areas, the results were published in booklet form.  The College took measures to remove all friable asbestos.  All remaining asbestos is encapsulated and is no danger to members of the campus community.  An authorized environmental group trained all maintenance personnel to work safely around asbestos.  A certified environmental contractor performs all abatement. [Asbestos]

 

The Public Safety Office’s Hazardous Communications Plan details container labeling, Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS), and safe work practices.  This office is responsible for training each College employee in HAZ/COM basics.  Hazardous Materials handling is in accordance with OSHA General Industry Standards 1910-1200 guidelines.  [Policy VII 80.1, Hazardous Material Communication Program]  Public Safety is also responsible for updating MSDS books in each area where chemicals exist and for disposing of old chemicals in accordance with OSHA laws.  The College keeps the MSDS campus master file in the Public Safety Office.

 

Public Safety is responsible for the safe and appropriate removal of the Health Sciences programs’ medical waste and sharps.  The College has procured a DHEC number under the classification of small generator (less than 50 lbs.) for the purpose of tracking the amount of medical waste disposed of each year.  Also, the College contracts with Spartanburg Regional Medical Center to receive the waste and sharps.

 

The College’s Public Safety Office develops checklists for regular inspections of emergency equipment: fire extinguishers, exit lights, emergency lights, call boxes, panic alarms, cameras, first aid kits, emergency showers, and eyewash stations.  These checklists are in the Public Safety Office.

 

The College provides first aid kits for all division offices, laboratories, and shops. Public Safety is responsible for keeping supplies in these kits.  [First-Aid]  The full-time Public Safety Officers serve on the Campus Safety Committee. In order to provide a safe and healthy environment for employees, students, and visitors, Procedure III-10.19, Safety Procedure, directs that the Safety Committee will inspect, monitor, and make recommendations to ensure that the College is in full compliance with all regulations set forth by SCDOL, OSHA, DHEC, and EPA.  The committee mails safety tips to all faculty and staff during the year and posts these on the College website.

 

Individual academic departments are responsible for determining and implementing appropriate safety procedures in their teaching laboratories:  health sciences—sharps,  blood-borne pathogens; janitorial—cleaning supplies; welding—equipment safety, etc.

 

Physical Plant provides cleaning services for the campus.  Most scheduled cleaning occurs between the hours of 11:00 p.m. and 7:00 a.m.; maids and porters are available throughout the day and evening to monitor restrooms and high traffic areas. [Janitorial Services]

 

Spartanburg Community College’s Human Resources has established a number of policies and procedures in order to provide a safe and healthy environment for the campus community.  These procedures include the following:

·        Reporting accidents that need medical treatment to Human Resource. 

·        Handling psychological problems or severe behavioral problems through the counseling staff and security.

·        Providing written instructions to handle on-campus alcohol and drug problems for students and staff. Also, the College provides a printed bulletin to new students and staff stating the College’s position, awareness programs, effects of abuse, list of law violations, and assistance programs.

·        Requiring all employees to wear safety belts when riding in a college vehicle.

·        Providing education services and referral with respect to Aids and HIV infection in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.

·        Prohibiting smoking within any building on campus, in compliance with the SC Clean Indoor Air Act of 1990.

·        Providing faculty and staff an Employee Assistance Program (REACH) for confidential assessment of personal problems that may be affecting their work and possible referral.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.10.6

Documentation

Criminal Justice Academy certificate

 

Spartanburg Community College Public Safety/Security Department

 

Student–Right-To-Know and Campus Security Act, Public Law 101-542;

Safety Watch brochure

 

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog, page 30, Campus Safety and Security/Student-Right-To-Know

 

Procedure VII-70.1 Fire Evacuation

 

Procedure II-30.1 First-Aid, EMS

 

Campus Safety Plan

 

State Accident Fund

 

Asbestos Statement / Asbestos Survey

 

Hazardous Communications Plan

 

Policy VII-80 and Procedure VII-80.1 Hazardous Material Communication Program

 

Example of MSDS  from campus master file

 

Medical waste contract

 

Examples of emergency equipment checklists

 

Safety Committee Meeting Minutes

 

Procedure III-10.19 Safety Procedures: to ensure that STC is in full compliance with all regulations set forth by SCDOL, OSHA, DHEC and EPA.

 

Campus Safety Committee tips

 

Procedure VII-50.1 Janitorial Services

 

Procedure II-30.2 Accidents

 

Procedure II-30.3 Psychological Problems

 

Procedure II-30.4 Alcohol/Drug Problems

 

Procedure VI-320.1 Employee Alcohol/Drug Use

 

Alcohol and Other Drug Use brochure

 

Policy II-170 Safety Belts Policy

 

Policy II-180 and Procedure II-180.1.HIV Infection and AIDS (complies with Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990)

 

Procedure II-220.1 Smoking Prohibition (complies with SC Clean Indoor Air Act of 1990)

 

Procedure VI-300 .1 Guidelines for Employee Assistance

 

3.10.7  The institution operates and maintains physical facilities, both on and off campus, that are adequate to serve the needs of the institution=s educational programs, support services, and mission-related activities.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Located at 800 Brisack Road in Spartanburg, South Carolina, Spartanburg Community College’s main campus consists of eleven buildings:  Central Energy Plant, East, Industrial Training Facility, James P. Ledbetter, Jr., Tracy J. Gaines Learning Resource Center, Maintenance, Physical Plant, West, Health and Human Services Building, Dan Lee Terhune Student Services Building, and Horticulture Greenhouses.  The main campus site is approximately 400,000 square feet.  Distance Learning Facilities are located in the Tracy Gaines Learning Resource Center.  Two classrooms utilize state-of-the-art videoconferencing equipment to broadcast distance learning courses to other sites. Spartanburg Community College also operates one satellite facility.  At 210 Commerce Court in Duncan, South Carolina, this 41,250 square-foot site is used primarily for lecturers and Industry and Business Training courses.  A future campus on Interstate 85 in Gaffney, South Carolina, is also underway. [Campus Maps, Building Data, Campus Pictures]

 

The Physical Plant Department is responsible for the maintenance of the main campus and satellite facility.  This department’s master plan denotes the renovations and expansions of the two sites’ physical facilities.  In addition, the department is also responsible for the facilities’ cleanliness, aesthetics, accessibility, and daily operation.  Employees make requests for maintenance directly to the department, which places them on a trouble report and assigns the tasks to maintenance employees.  This department also maintains equipment, roofing, doors, and other necessary scheduled checks, logging these on Preventive Maintenance Cards.

 

The South Carolina Office of State Engineer must first approve all new and renovation construction work drawings and specifications.  When performing renovations and expansion of the facilities, the department follows the codes set by the American Disabilities Act ensuring proper campus and building accessibility for disabled students.  Also, the College’s Student Disability Services Center and the Cooperative Program for the Deaf and the Blind offer services to students with disabilities.

 

In addition to prior renovations and expansions, plans for a new library/academic building also exist.  Preliminary meetings with the architects, McMillan Smith and Partners, are underway, with June 2006 as the anticipated completion date.

 

The Central Energy Plant is approximately 2,800 square feet and houses chillers, circulation pumps, and cooling towers.  This plant provides chilled water through underground pipes to cool all buildings on the main campus.

 

As of Fall 2003, the CHE Facilities Usage Report shows the following percentages of usage for the main campus: 

Assignable Area (ASF)                                326,235 square feet

 

Instruction                                                                   65.6%

 

Public Service                                                           1.7%

 

Academic Support                                                    4.1%

 

Student Services                                                       7.0%

 

Institutional Support                                                   9.0%

 

Plant Operations & Maintenance                            2.9%

 

Auxiliary Enterprises                                                 5.3%

 

Unassigned                                                                4.0%

 

Comparing this usage data to other technical colleges in the CHE analysis indicates the College’s facilities are adequate to serve the needs of the institution’s educational programs, support services, and mission-related activities.

 

COMPREHENSIVE STANDARD 3.10.7

Documentation

Campus Maps & Locations

 

ADA Information

 

Master Plans & Updates

 

Preventive Maintenance Cards

 

Cooperative Program for the Deaf and the Blind Agreement

 

Building Data Summary Report

 

Facilities Usage Data Report

 

PRO VIII-60.1 Trouble Reports

 

Work Order Log

 

Campus Pictures

 

 

       

Section 4 FEDERAL REQUIREMENTS

 

4.1       When evaluating success with respect to student achievement in relation to the institution=s mission, the institution includes, as appropriate, consideration of course completion, state licensing examinations, and job placement rates.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College participates in Title IV Federal Aid programs, including Federal Pell Grant, Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant, Federal Work Study, Federal Stafford Loan, and Success Network (a Trio Program). As a Title IV participant, the College must meet requirements of the regulations which specify satisfactory academic progress (SAP) for course completion during the terms of enrollment.  The College also sets standards of progress  for Grade Point Average (GPA) for the number of credit hours attempted.  Students who fail to meet the standard are subject to Academic Probation or Academic Suspension.  The College reports licensure examination pass rates to the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education (CHE) for evaluation/scoring under the Performance Funding model developed by CHE over the past eight years.  Each year, the College reports enrollment, graduation, and job placement rates for all associate degree and diploma programs to the State Board for Technical and Comprehensive Education (SCTCS).  Each of these factors indicates student success and helps validate that the College is accomplishing its mission and meeting the federal mandate. (Only enrollment data are reported on certificate programs.)

 

Course Completion

The College monitors the enrollment status of all students according to the College’s attendance policy.  Each faculty member is required to maintain a record of each student’s attendance throughout the term.  Faculty grade books are maintained for a one-year period following submission of final grades, as described in the STC Policy and Procedures manual (PRO IV-10.3).  Full-time faculty retain their own grade books; department heads collect and retain the grade books of adjunct faculty.  Faculty are required to report “never attended” status at the census date (dates vary depending upon length of the term).   The Records Office deletes from the roster any student who fails to attend at least one class prior to the census date.  The Financial Aid Office adjusts the aid of any student whose deletion results in a financial aid status change.  Students who withdraw from a course after the census date receive a grade of W or WF, representing the pass/non-pass standing of the student at the last date of attendance.   Administrators in Academic Affairs (deans and/or department heads) monitor course completions through a report, available on administrators’ desktops; this report permits a review of students’ grades as well as withdrawals for a single course, each course within a department, or every course at the College.  A sample of this report from the Horticulture Department demonstrates how grade distribution data are summarized for department heads.  As an example of how departments use this report, the Transitional Studies department used the pass rate in subsequent mathematics courses to help justify changes to competencies in remedial mathematics courses. 

 

The College has adopted a statement on Academic Standards of Progress which defines the GPA requirements for credit hours attempted:

 

For associate degree programs, students who have attempted 0-18 credit hours must have a minimum GPA of 1.4; 19-36 credit hours, 1.6 GPA; 37-45 credit hours, 1.8 GPA; over 45 credit hours, 2.0 GPA.  For diplomas and one-year certificate programs, students who have attempted 0-18 credit hours must maintain a minimum GPA of 1.6; 19-30 credit hours, 1.8 GPA; over 30 credit hours, 2.0 GPA. For certificates that are less than one year, students who have attempted 8-20 credit hours must have a minimum of a 2.0 GPA. Students who fail to meet these standards are placed on Academic Probation.  Students who do not earn a 2.0 GPA during the probation term are suspended from the College for the following term.

 

In compliance with Title IV of the Higher Education Act, STC monitors academic success and attainment of financial aid recipients.  Annually, federal and state auditors evaluate the administration of the College’s financial aid program to ensure compliance with federal regulations.  In addition to monitoring for academic standards, length of eligibility, and program changes, the auditors also evaluate the financial aid program for proper processing of withdrawals and Return of Federal Financial Aid  requirements.

 

For 2003-2004, approximately 80 percent of STC students received financial aid subject to Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) standards.  (In 2004-2005, the SC Education Lottery adopted a different set of criteria than SAP).  In general, the criteria for students to continue receiving Title IV aid are as follows:

 

Academic Standards

The minimum credit hour completion rate requires students to earn at least 67 percent of the cumulative hours attempted.  Courses with grades of F, W, WF and I are not considered completed courses.  Students are also required to maintain a grade point average (GPA) as defined by the College in the academic standards of progress….

 

Length of Eligibility

A student may receive financial aid for 1.5 times the published length of the program of study provided the student meets the academic standards outlined in this policy.  Transfer hours are added to the total hours attempted at Spartanburg Community College to assess the length of eligibility….

 

Program Changes

A student is allowed two program of study changes before completing a degree, diploma or certificate…. 

 

The College’s Financial Aid director monitors federal regulations each year to assure that the most current SAP standards are in place.

 

Licensure Exams

As a part of the South Carolina Commission on Higher Education’s Performance Funding initiative, Spartanburg Community College annually reports the results of licensure exams for the following programs in the Health and Human Services division: Medical Assisting, Medical Laboratory Technology, Respiratory Care, Radiologic Technology, Practical Nursing*, and Surgical Technology.  In the past, the College has reported results for Expanded Duty Dental Assisting, but CHE has deferred this measure because of statewide problems with data verification.  For the purposes of Performance Funding, licensure examination results from all programs are aggregated to form a single “pass rate” for all first-time examinees within a given year (April 1-March 30).  CHE does not use norming factors, such as national or state pass rates, for Performance Funding purposes. 

 

A single number representing the College’s performance provides little information that an individual departmental can use.  Departments whose students take licensure exams use the results as a measure of program outcomes and give considerable attention to graduates’ results when formulating improvement plans.  STC responds quickly to provide resources to programs whose graduates are not being successful on a licensure examination.  Each year, departments evaluate the results of their students’ licensure exams and modify the program or delivery methodology as necessary (for example, adding more computer-based simulations).  Professional Licensure Test Results report scores by program and the College’s total score for the past five years.

 

*Practical Nursing as an entry-level program was eliminated from the College’s 2004-2005 catalog.  Practical Nursing will continue as a “stop-out” program only (i.e., no students will be accepted in the program, but students who complete the first year only of the Associate Degree Nursing program will be awarded a Practical Nursing diploma.)

 

Job Placement Rates

The Career Planning and Placement (CP&P) office assists program graduates with job information and assistance in employment searches.  Annually, the CP&P staff completes a graduate survey and an employer follow-up survey.

 

Using the College’s management information system database, CP&P generates a complete list of all graduates for Summer, Fall and Spring terms.  The staff mails the graduate survey to each graduate three months after his or her graduation.  The survey generates information on employment status, education status, satisfaction with the College and program, and goal attainment.  One month after mailing the graduate surveys, the staff reviews the number of completed surveys that have been returned and implements a follow-up procedure.  The follow-up consists of either mailing the survey a second time or trying to contact the graduates by telephone.  In some cases, CP & P may contact faculty for assistance on follow-up.  CP&P’s goal is to obtain a report on every graduate on its lists.  For each survey returned from an employed graduate, the CP&P staff mails a separate survey to the employer, with the graduate’s approval. 

 

In November, CP&P requests, from the Dean of Enrollment Management and the Information Technology department, the most recent National Center for Educational Statistics (NCES) Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System (IPEDS) report of graduates.  Staff compares the list obtained from the management information system with the official IPEDS results.  If the two lists do not match, the list generated from IPEDS is considered “official”; the local lists are adjusted accordingly.  Information on graduate placement is also part of the Perkins III accountability reporting requirements.

 

By February 1, CP&P submits the placement report to the Institutional Research Office for compilation and publication.  The Director of Institutional Research publishes the Graduate and Employer Follow-up reports for each of the preceding five years in hard copy, as well as in an electronic version in Public Folders. Departments use this information in their annual program review process.  The Office of Academic Affairs coordinates the program review process  and reports it to the South Carolina Technical College System (SCTCS).  SCTCS produces a program evaluation report that compares each program to statewide standards for enrollment, graduates, and placement (for associate degree and diploma programs) and for enrollment in certificate programs.  The College is required to justify to SCTCS any program that fails to meet the standards.

 

FEDERAL REQUIREMENT 4.1

Documentation

On-Campus Location

 Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog

Page 56

Page 54

Page 43

Pages 57-58

Page 56

 

 

PRO IV-10.3

 

 

Professional Licensure Test Results (1999/2000 – 2003/2004)

 

 

Sample: Graduate Survey

 

 

Sample: Employer Follow-up Survey

 

 

Graduate Survey Results

 

 

Employer Follow-up Survey Results

 

 

Program Evaluation Report  (Sample)

 

 

4.2       The institution maintains a curriculum that is directly related and appropriate to the purpose and goals of the institution and the diplomas, certificates, or degrees awarded.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  The mission statement of Spartanburg Community College describes the purpose of the College as

 

advancing economic development of the region through programs that address emerging and continuing employment needs in a rapidly changing global environment.  Programs and services provide accessible, affordable, equitable, state-of-the-art, post-secondary education that effectively 1) prepares students to enter, adapt to, or advance in technical or service career fields; 2) provides students with pre-baccalaureate programs and courses which transfer to senior colleges and universities…

 

The mission statement is approved by the President’s Council and then by the Area Commission.

 

The College offers academic programs that directly reflect the emerging employment needs of the designated service area (Union, Cherokee and Spartanburg counties).  The University Transfer program serves students whose goal is to continue to a four-year college or university after completing an Associate in Arts or Sciences degree from Spartanburg Community College.   

Per College Policy II-190 and Procedure II-190.1, each program must have an advisory committee.   Each committee helps to determine the knowledge, skills and abilities needed for a student to be successful in the workforce.  Each member must adhere to the Spartanburg Community College Advisory Committee Handbook.  The College develops the program based on information that it collects from the advisory committees. The College uses Occupational Task Analysis (OTA) in conjunction with the Instructional Program Self-Study to review academic programs. Specifically, the College uses the OTA to assist in the development of new associate degree or diploma programs and to update/revise existing programs.

 

Through course assessment, the College uses course completion, positive evaluation of instruction results, and feedback from external sources regarding student attainment of course competencies to evaluate the effective of teaching, assessment, and course structure. Departments complete course assessment on an annual basis for every course taught.

 

FEDERAL REQUIREMENT 4.2

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog, page 5

 

 

College Website

 

 

POL II-190

 

 

PRO II-190.1

 

 

PRO IV-10.16

 

 

PRO IV-10.17

 

 

PRO IV-10.22

 

 

4.3       The institution makes available to students and the public current academic calendars, grading policies, and refund policies.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

 

Narrative:  Spartanburg Community College publishes a current academic calendar in each College catalog, the current semester course offering schedule, and the student planner and handbook.  All of these publications are also available on the College website.  In addition, students may pick up a copy of the student planner and handbook and the College catalog in the Admissions Office throughout the semester.

 

The College publishes the grading policies in the College catalog, the student planner and handbook, and in each course syllabus.  The grading scale for each course is published in each course syllabus.

 

Students may access the policies for obtaining a refund for overpayment or for dropped courses through several sources.  The College catalog, the current semester’s course offering schedule, and the student planner and handbook all contain information on current refund policies.  The student planner and handbook contains a calendar that posts dates and pro-rated percentages of refunds.  The College website also lists these policies under the appropriate publication.  Continuing Education publicizes the applicable refund policies in their publications.

 

FEDERAL REQUIREMENT 4.3

Documentation

On-Campus Location

Spartanburg Community College 2004-2005 Catalog

Page 2

Pages 58-59

Page 53

 

 

Spartanburg Community College Student Planner & Handbook 2004-2005

Page 4

Page 77

Pages 9-10 and 29-30

 

 

Spring 2005 Course Schedule

 

 

Course Syllabus Template

 

 

Continuing Education Spring 2005 Schedule of Courses

 

 

POL III-40

 

 

PRO III-40.1

 

 

College Website

 

 

4.4       The institution demonstrates that program length is appropriate for each of the degrees offered.

 

    Compliance              Partial Compliance              Non-Compliance

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